Advice issued over dangers of giant hogweed

The giant plant, which is a cousin of cow parsley, has a sap that can burn skin. Picture: Jon Savage
The giant plant, which is a cousin of cow parsley, has a sap that can burn skin. Picture: Jon Savage
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It’s the monster plant that can cause severe burns and even blindness – and it’s spreading across the Lothians.

National trade body the Property Care Association (PCA) has urged residents across Edinburgh “to treat giant hogweed with caution”.

In recent weeks, the invasive weed has been thrust into the media spotlight following a raft of injuries – including to children – as a result of people touching it.

Experts have warned such incidents could increase as children roam affected areas during the summer holidays.

Yesterday, the Evening News reported giant hogweed had been spotted sprouting in thick clumps in areas in and around the city, including Seafield, Mayfield and Easthouses.

Giant hogweed sap is extremely toxic to the skin in sunlight, making it a serious and significant danger to public health.

Information on how to identify and control the plant, as well as guidance on the health risks associated with it and its impact on local areas, can be found on the PCA website.