Aiden Moffat, 16, in British Touring Car bid

Aiden Moffat to make BTCC history. Picture: Ian Georgeson
Aiden Moffat to make BTCC history. Picture: Ian Georgeson
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He’s set to line up on the grid alongside battled-hardened rivals twice his age – but he doesn’t even have his provisional licence.

Racing prodigy Aiden Moffat, 16, who can’t get served in a pub, smoke or even give blood, is gearing up to become the youngest-ever driver in the Dunlop MSA British Touring Car Championship (BTCC).

The BTCC, a prestigious race series boasting some of the top track racers in the UK, now has a new wonderkid.

Aiden, from Dalkeith, will represent Finesse Motorsports, facing off against top names in the sport including three-time winner Matt Neal and last year’s champion Gordon Shedden at Knockhill this weekend.

But while battling for pole is a nerve-shredding prospect, the motor-racing starlet isn’t feeling the pressure.

He said: “Of course I’m nervous, but if you’re not nervous during something like this you’re probably not going for it enough. I just get in the car and drive and don’t think about everything else, like being younger.”

The teenager’s need for speed was sparked at a go-karting party on his 12th birthday. It was then he decided he wanted to drive competitively.
Mum Donna and dad Bob are his biggest cheerleaders and support his sporting dreams despite the inherent danger of motor racing.

Last month, Aiden suffered a horror crash at Celtic Speed Raceday but walked away with cuts and bruises.

He said: “I just got out of the car, and as I looked around to see how bad it was, it didn’t faze me and I was back racing the same day. My injuries weren’t bad enough to make me go slow around the corners next time.”

However, his worried parents don’t share their son’s fearless attitude.

Dad Bob said: “There are some corners he drives round that I just don’t watch. In particular, the one he crashed into at Knockhill. When that happened, me and Aiden’s mum missed it. She said if she’d have been standing there she would have jumped the barrier to rescue her boy.”

There could be big things in store for Aiden as the previous youngest competitor Tom Chilton – he was 17 – has gone on to travel the world and appear on Top Gear.

The budding driver’s success story has won a mixed response from his peers.

“The friends of mine that are into racing are proud and they think it’s great, but some others don’t even have a clue what it’s all about,” said Aiden.

The teenager says, though, that he has not set aside the classroom for fame. Studies come first for the sixth-year George Watson’s College student, but travelling to England for junior races has meant periods of absence from school.

Bob said: “Aiden outside of a car is a typical teenager – no life about him and this attitude where tomorrow’s plenty of time away. But when you put him in a car, he becomes very mature.

“Some racing teams say that they find it remarkable how clever a kid he is on the track.”

Neil Giddings, Aiden’s team manager at Finesse Motorsport, said: “He knows Knockhill well, so we’re all looking forward to the challenge.”