Artist draws on experience of motherhood for book

Illustrator Lucy Scott started 'doodling' snapshots of her life after giving birth to her first child Lois in July 2012. Picture: Contributed
Illustrator Lucy Scott started 'doodling' snapshots of her life after giving birth to her first child Lois in July 2012. Picture: Contributed
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A MUM has drawn on her experiences of her first year as a parent by launching a new picture book.

Lucy Scott, from Stockbridge, started sketching funny moments from her life after giving birth to her first child Lois in July 2012.

When her daughter celebrated her first birthday, the 41-year-old discovered she had built up a huge collection of illustrations which she wanted to share.

From turning up at a playdate covered in sick to dressing a bemused baby in a ridiculous new outfit from her grandmother, her first book, Doodle Diary of a New Mum: An Illustrated Journey Through One Mummy’s First Year, contains 128 poignant and funny illustrations. The Edinburgh College of Art graduate sent off her drawings to American publishing house Running Press, which snapped up the artwork.

She said: “I started doodling when I had a spare few minutes, which wasn’t very often, but soon realised I’d done quite a few over the year.

“A few of my mum friends suggested I should try and get them published as they had all had similar experiences with their little ones.

“I never really expected to get them published, but I hope it gives people a laugh.”

Ms Scott, who is the co-founder of Treehouse 24, a pre-production visualising studio for advertisers, said she started the doodles as a way of preserving memories of her “feisty wee girl”.

Writing in the introduction, Miss Scott said: “For me, the learning curve of parenthood was a ludicrously steep one, made all the more difficult to climb with stitches in, ahem, private places, yo-yoing hormones and the kind of sleep deprivation normally reserved for chronic insomniacs.

“For those of you who are bringing up your baby alone or effectively alone, or for those of you that have more than one child, I stand erect in my best outfit and salute you – or bow as low as my belly allows, whichever you’d prefer.

“Even with a lovely, very involved bloke by my side – Tom, Lois’s dad – my precious, wonderful baby can have me whimpering on my knees.”

Ms Scott said being a new mum has meant hot meals have become a luxury, going to the bathroom is “a mission” and maintaining “socially acceptable personal hygiene levels” has been a challenge.

“It’s tough – I miss my partner even though I pass him regularly in the hall,” she said.

Ms Scott said how she vaguely remembers a world before Lois, a world “before sticky carpets” and of ‘wearing make-up . . . with nice nails and a handbag not filled with mashed banana and 
raisins”.

But she added: “It is impossible to grumble when somehow I have created the most wonderful little person that I could ever have imagined, a feisty wee girl full of character, humour and kindness.

“Who’d swap that for nice nails?”