Father of murdered boy fears “bumping into killer”

David and Anne Wyse are furious that their son Neil's killer has been released. Picture: Ian Georgeson
David and Anne Wyse are furious that their son Neil's killer has been released. Picture: Ian Georgeson
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A MURDERED schoolboy’s father has told of his fear that he will “bump into” his son’s killer while at work.

David Wyse, a gas and electricity meter reader, said he could not predict how he would react if he were to knock on the door of Henry Williamson, who is preparing for freedom after serving 22 years of a life sentence for strangling nine-year-old Neil Wyse in 1992.

Neil (9) with his sister Gemma (5) taken in 1992 before his murder. Picture: Ian Georgeson

Neil (9) with his sister Gemma (5) taken in 1992 before his murder. Picture: Ian Georgeson

He has also revealed his frustration at the lack of consultation on Williamson’s release after receiving only a letter from the Scottish Prison Service (SPS) to say he was due to leave jail.

The comments come days after Secretary of State for Justice Michael Gove vowed to overhaul the legal system in England amid claims it fails victims of crime. Mr Wyse, 53, who reads gas and electricity meters for G4S, said: “I don’t know what my reaction would be if I bumped into him – I don’t know what I would do.

“I work all over the place – Edinburgh and the surrounding areas. With the type of job I do, I could visit his house or the house of his family. I could go and knock their door and not know I was knocking their door.

“I’m not a violent person but if something like that was put in front of me, I don’t know how I would react.”

He added: “We received a phone call from someone saying he’d be getting ready for parole a couple of years ago and a letter. We’ve heard nothing since.”

Local political figures have also criticised the lack of consultation.

Midlothian councillor Peter de Vink said: “I’m absolutely appalled when something like that happens – that the parents of a boy who is murdered are not consulted.

“For the prison services just to casually write a letter saying he would be released is not good enough.”

Williamson, now 41, was 19 when he murdered Neil, pouncing on the schoolboy while he walked his dog, Laddie, in Gore Glen park in Gorebridge, and strangling him with the pet’s lead.

He then dumped Neil in a freezing pond before claiming he had found the ­youngster and tried to save him.

Williamson gave TV interviews after being hailed as a hero as police initially ruled that the incident was not suspicious.

Meanwhile, Neil clung to life in hospital for three days before his parents made the heartbreaking decision to switch off his life-support machine.

Williamson denied murder but received a life sentence in 1993, which he is serving at Greenock prison. In recent days he has reportedly been spotted picking up litter outside the prison as his release edges closer.

Mr Wyse said: “The pain of losing Neil is still as intense as it was all those years ago. He’d be a danger if he was released, I really believe that. The fact he’s spent so long behind bars tells you something. Not many people spend 22 years in prison for murder in this country.”

An SPS spokesman said: “We can’t comment on individual prisoners.”