Killer James Hendry jailed for 40 months

James Hendry was said to have shown 'no remorse' over the killing. Picture: Lisa Ferguson
James Hendry was said to have shown 'no remorse' over the killing. Picture: Lisa Ferguson
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Detectives today said a notorious thug who killed a former royal bodyguard with a single punch had “shown no remorse” over the death before being jailed for 40 months.

James Hendry struck 54-year-old ex-soldier Edward Dooley when he caught him ­relieving himself in a bush next to his home in 2008.

The 34-year-old was finally arrested by police last year after the victim’s family campaigned for years to have Mr Dooley’s death reinvestigated.

Hendry was sentenced at the High Court in Glasgow yesterday for the culpable homicide of Mr Dooley near the Ikea store at Straiton.

Following sentencing, ­Detective Chief Superintendent ­Lesley Boal, who oversaw the investigation, said she hoped the jail term would offer “the small comfort of some closure” for Mr Dooley’s family.

Mr Dooley was due to get off a bus beside his home in ­Bilston, but his family and police believe he was unable to wait to urinate – possibly as a result of a prostate operation he underwent weeks before – and jumped off two stops early ­beside the Hendry house.

Moments later, Hendry and his brother, Jacob Hendry, 41, arrived home in a taxi from a night out drinking and the younger sibling punched Mr Dooley on the head, knocking him to the ground and inflicting skull and spine fractures.

The Hendrys are part of an infamous south Edinburgh family which has racked up ­numerous convictions for ­violence over the years.

James Hendry was shot by drug dealer Jamie Bain in The Marmion pub attack in April 2006, which saw his brother-in-law, Alex McKinnon, killed.

A police team was formed to investigate Mr Dooley’s death after the case was reopened in November 2012 in response to his family uncovering new information in their own ­independent probe.

Det Chief Supt Boal said: “My thoughts are with Edward Dooley’s family at this difficult time. Since October 2008 Mr Dooley’s family have sought justice and I hope the guilty plea of James Hendry to ­culpable homicide offered them some comfort.

“This was a complex inquiry and everyone involved has been touched by the circumstances.

“Edward Dooley was a much-loved father and grandfather who was making his way home on a Saturday after socialising with an old friend. Such an ­unremarkable evening had fatal consequences when, not far from his home address, Edward was senselessly assaulted by James Hendry.

“Hendry, who had no previous connection with Edward, frustrated the investigation and has shown no remorse, compounding the trauma of bereavement. I sincerely hope the sentencing will allow them the small comfort of some closure.”