Diamond duo have world at their feet

Douglas and Adah enjoy travelling

Douglas and Adah enjoy travelling

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A city couple have celebrated their diamond wedding anniversary.

Douglas Purves Pringle married Adah Falconer six decades ago at Edinkillie Parish Church in Dunphail, Morayshire, following an eight-month engagement.

Like many other couples in the post-war years, the pair – who moved to Corstorphine three years later – had met at a dance in Inverness in 1954.

Douglas, from Edinburgh, was working as an executive officer for the Forestry Commission in the city at the time, while Adah, from Dunphail, was undertaking her fever nurse training at the former Culduthel Hospital.

Douglas had carried out his national service in the RAF and had spent time in Northern Ireland.

The happy couple spent the first few years of their married life in Inverness at a house called Green Gables, before moving to the Capital.

In the years that followed they moved around frequently, living in Bishopbriggs, Winchester and Chester before moving back to Edinburgh for good in 1984, where they have lived ever since in a flat overlooking Dean Bridge.

The couple have four children – Anne, 56, Thomas, 54, Joan, 53, and Irene, 51 – as well as an 18-year-old grandchild, Nadja.

Douglas retired in 1991 after a long career working for the Forestry Commission and was awarded an OBE from the Queen for his services to the industry on June 15 that year – an event that saw much of the family troop down to Buckingham Palace to attend the ceremony.

Adah, 85, used her nursing skills in hospitals throughout her life and later looked after people in their own homes.

But retirement hasn’t meant the pair have slowed down, with a love of travelling still regularly sending them whizzing off around the globe.

In the past they enjoyed a number of hiking trips in the Austrian Alps, while a family holiday in May this year saw them jetting off to the sunny climes of Portugal. Rumours abound that Douglas is already planning their next exotic jaunt abroad – this time a cruise.

Back home, the couple enjoy long walks around the city with the Royal Botanic Garden and the Scottish Parliament favourite haunts. They are revered among friends and family for knowing all of the Capital’s best coffee shops and cafes.

Douglas, 84, is also a keen historian and wrote a book on the history of the Forestry Commission during the first stage of his retirement.

Daughter Anne said: “They are very sociable. They’ve always liked having their parties and having people round – though obviously not quite so much now. They enjoy their travelling and seeing the world, and they still go out on their walks.”

The couple’s anniversary will be celebrated at the Bonham Hotel.

ALISTAIR GRANT