Jupiter Artland in running for £100,000 art prize

Cells of Life land-forms by Charles Jencks at the Jupiter Artland in West Lothian. Picture: Jane Barlow
Cells of Life land-forms by Charles Jencks at the Jupiter Artland in West Lothian. Picture: Jane Barlow
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A VAST sculpture garden in the grounds of a 17th-century Jacobean manor house near Edinburgh Airport is in the running to win Britain’s most lucrative art prize.

Jupiter Artland, which has more than 30 works specially commissioned by private collectors Robert and Nicky Wilson, will compete against the V&A in London for the “museum of the year” honour.

A Forest, by Jim Lambie, at Jupiter Artland. Picture: Neil Hanna

A Forest, by Jim Lambie, at Jupiter Artland. Picture: Neil Hanna

The attraction, set in 100 acres of woodland and meadows at Wilkieston, took five years to create before it was unveiled in 2009. Scottish, UK and international artists showcased there include Antony Gormley, Andy Goldsworthy, Charles Jencks, Jim Lambie, Nathan Coley, Cornelia Parker and Anish Kapoor.

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As well as the growing collection of site-specific outdoor works, which are usually added to every year, Jupiter Artland also plays host to a changing programme of temporary exhibitions and installations.

It is one of five contenders for the £100,000 Art Fund Prize – the biggest museum prize in the world and the richest in the UK. The prize, which recognises “exceptional imagination, innovation and achievement”, is open to UK museums and galleries of any size.

I think we’re the wild card of the nominees, and a bit bonkers and eccentric, but it’s lovely to be recognised as the team here work so hard all year round.

Nicky Wilson

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Jupiter Artland would be the first Scottish winner of the award since 2004, when the title went to the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in Edinburgh, if it claims the title in July. Recent contenders have included Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in Glasgow, the Robert Burns Birthplace Museum in Ayrshire and the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh.

Also nominated are the Arnolfini arts centre in Bristol, York Art Gallery, which recently reopened after an £8 million refurbishment, and the new Bethlem Museum of the Mind, in Kent, which charts the history of mental healthcare and treatment.

Around 80,000 visitors, including 10,000 schoolchildren, flocked last year to Jupiter Artland, which is only open to the public from May to September. It has just 13 staff.

Nicky Wilson admitted she had initially felt Jupiter Artland was “far too small and insignificant” to stand a chance of being nominated.

She added: “We went ahead with an application and forgot all about it. We could have been knocked over with a feather when he heard we had been shortlisted. It’s so unexpected, but also really exciting.

“I think we’re the wild card of the nominees, and a bit bonkers and eccentric, but it’s lovely to be recognised as the team here work so hard all year round.”

Manuela Calchini, regional director of VisitScotland, said: “We’re delighted to hear that Jupiter Artland has been shortlisted. It is a shining example of Scotland’s creative and cultural sector.”