Liam Rudden: On the T2 trainspotting orange carpet

Jonny Lee Miller. Pic:  James Gourley/Rex

Jonny Lee Miller. Pic: James Gourley/Rex

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ORANGE. The red carpet was orange. Robert Carlyle was shorter than I expected. Actually, not one of the stars of Trainspotting was as tall as I thought they would be, so I was in good company.

Just a couple of the thoughts that passed through my head at the World Premiere of T2.

Oh, and that newcomer Anjela Nedyalkova must have been absolutely freezing in her shimmering metallic blue dress that, stunning as it was, really didn’t look like a sensible choice for such bitterly cold night.

And it was indeed Baltic.

That was the first thing I noticed arriving at Fountain Park, that and the fact that there was, initially, little to see.

Temporary screens ensured that prying eyes from the street were deprived a view of the spectacle unfolding outside Cineworld. Only the roars of approval and the booming PA system gave the game away.

Two and a half hours before the much-anticipated screening of T2, the strains of Born Slippy and instantly recognisable tracks from the original Trainspotting faded in and out, interspersed with interviews as the stars of the movie arrived on the orange carpet, much to the delight of the hundreds of wristband holders who had queued for hours to catch a glimpse of their heroes. They weren’t disappointed.

Once on the other side of the fence, an explosion of orange and white branding, skyward pointing floodlights, and a barrage of spotlights hit me, creating a spectacular setting for the occasion - there’s no doubt that when Sony Pictures do a World Premiere they do it well.

Ewan McGregor, Jonny Lee Miller, Ewen Bremner and Robert Carlyle appeared on good form too.

As were director Danny Boyle and the man responsible for the whole Trainspotting phenomenon, Irvine Welsh.

Award-winning local hip hop band Young Fathers and Holyrood Boxing’s Bradley Welsh too soaked up the growing excitement and expectation with guests, fans and stars alike.

Those penned behind makeshift barriers, arms outstretched with pens and souvenirs to be signed, became even more frenzied when the famous quartet catered to their every whim; signatures, selfies and even the odd kiss were snatched.

Jonny Lee Miller, with the longest name of the three, signed like a man possessed ensuring no fan went without, his squiggle surely no more than initials.

Carlyle too, happily posed for the now obligatory selfies that have taken over from the humble autograph.

A little further along the approach, the centre piece of the production was a magnificent tiered dais topped by a gigantic, revolving T2.

Under this, Bremner was being interviewed by Edith Bowman, his every word beamed onto a massive screen and to a worldwide audience via Facebook and Twitter.

Planning a World Premiere any time soon?

Choose Sony Pictures.