Lynne McCrossan: My new clothing love is not quite what is seams

Kevin Stewart, lives Edinburgh City Centre. There's nothing better than a slick blazer on a man and Kevin certainly knows how to style the look up sharply. The blazer is J.Lindeberg, the crisp white shirt is Vivienne Westwood. Jeans are DSquared and the All Saints shoes are teamed with some Paul Smith.
Kevin Stewart, lives Edinburgh City Centre. There's nothing better than a slick blazer on a man and Kevin certainly knows how to style the look up sharply. The blazer is J.Lindeberg, the crisp white shirt is Vivienne Westwood. Jeans are DSquared and the All Saints shoes are teamed with some Paul Smith.
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Seams are the skeleton of any outfit. Thread as thin as fishbone to bind our clothes together, it’s a wonder we’re not all walking around in the buff it looks so fragile.

I’ve been unpicking lining like there is no tomorrow studying the stitching that fuses fabric together.

It’s not some new fetish, I’m just trying to soak up as much sewing knowledge as possible while on my capsule clothing collection challenge.

The fact the humble thread keeps us all clothed is pretty impressive considering it’s only a millimetre thick.

I’m lucky enough to get my hands on a wide array of fashion, from cheap and cheerful high street steals to high-end couture when I’m out shooting fashion spreads.

Initially I was outraged that designer duds tended to be lining-less. I thought it was mighty cheeky of them to expect someone to pay a premium for an unfinished piece.

Little did I known lining alters the shape of a simply cut garment, potentially adding bulk where it’s not wanted.

On top of that, the art is in the stitch. It’s truly beautiful to see how expensive cloth is bound together. Adding lining now feels a little like a dressmaker has something to hide rather than celebrating their craft.

It’s like the brush strokes on a painting, you wouldn’t want to conceal that.

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