Top ten Edinburgh shows coming soon

0
Have your say

Evening News entertainment editor Liam Rudden highlights his top ten shows coming to the Capital over the winter months

WAR HORSE

War Horse stage play. Pic: Comp

War Horse stage play. Pic: Comp

JOEY, the bay thoroughbred at the heart of Michael Murporgo’s wartime tale, promises to provide the highlight of the Capital’s winter theatre programme.

War Horse, at the Festival Theatre, tells the story of young Albert, his beloved horse and the unimaginable obstacles they overcome together. A tale of courage, loyalty and friendship, forget the movie version, this production from the National Theatre is already selling fast, so book now to avoid being disappointed.

Festival Theatre, Nicolson Street, 22 Jan-15 Feb, £20-£65, 0131-529 6000

LONG DAY’S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT

EUGENE O’Neill’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play opens the the Lyceum’s 2014 season. It tells of one fateful day in the Connecticut home of the Tyrone family. An intensely moving depiction of a family struggling with addiction, truth, love and the ability to face themselves and each other.

Royal Lyceum, Grindlay Street, 17 Jan-8 Feb, £12-£27.50, 0131-248 4848

DIAL M FOR MURDER

AS any fan of Alfred Hitchcock will tell you, there’s nothing better than a good old-fashioned thriller to get wrapped up in on a cold winter’s night. So head to the King’s and check out this gripping stage production of Frederick Knott’s Dial M For Murder - an erotic tale of betrayal, passion and ultimately murder.

King’s Theatre, Leven Street, 18-22 Feb, £14-£29.50, 0131-529 6000

EVITA

WET Wet Wet vocalist Marti Pellow returns to the Playhouse to star in the Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber musical, which tells the story of Eva Peron, wife of former Argentine dictator Juan Peron, and features such classics as Don’t Cry For Me Argentina, Oh What a Circus and Another Suitcase In Another Hall

Playhouse, Greenside Place, 27 Jan-8 Feb, £12.90-£53.90, 0844-871 3014

NOEL COWARD’S PRIVATE LIVES

AT the Lyceum, Coward’s 1930s romantic comedy is the perfect piece to catch on Valentine’s Day. It follows the difficult relationship of divorced couple Elyot and Amanda, who, while honeymooning with their new spouses, discover that they are staying in adjacent rooms at the same hotel in the South of France. Cue Elyot and Amanda falling in love - and hate - all over again.

Royal Lyceum, Grindlay Street, 14 Feb-8 Mar, £12-£27.50, 0131-248 4848

BUDDY: THE BUDDY HOLLY STORY

HE died before his time, but there’s a chance to relive the life of one of rock’n’roll’s greatests with Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story, at The King’s. Expect all the hits too - That’ll Be The Day, Oh Boy, Rave On, La Bamba, Chantilly Lace, Johnny B. Goode, Raining In My Heart, Everyday, Shout and, of course, Peggy Sue.

King’s Theatre, Leven Street, 10-15 Feb, £14-£27.50, 0131-529 6000

TONIGHT’S THE NIGHT - THE ROD STEWART MUSICAL

WRITTEN by Ben Elton, this smash hit musical comedy set on the mean streets of Detroit and glamorous clubs of LA, features timeless classics such as Maggie May, Baby Jane, Hot Legs, Sailing plus many more. Definitely a feel-good night out at the Playhouse for all Rod Stewart fans.

Playhouse, Greenside Place, 17-22 Feb, £12.90-£50.90, 0844-871 3014

SINGING IN THE RAIN

EVERYONE knows the MGM movie starring Gene Kelly, but now there’s a chance to catch another star of screen, Maxwell Caulfield, as he joins forces with Steps’ Faye Tozer in this stage spectacular at the Festival Theatre. Watch out for the 12,000 litres of water used to recreate Kelly’s famous singing in the rain scene.

Festival Theatre, Nicolson Street, 25 Feb-15 Mar, £17.50-£46.50, 0131-529 6000

SOME GIRL I USED TO KNOW

DENISE Van Outen stars as Stephanie Canworth, a beautiful, successful media darling with a great career and supportive husband, until a Facebook poke from a blast-from-the-past changes everything. Set in the 1980s, prepare to laugh and cry as Some Girl I Used to Know takes you on a journey back to a time when hair was big.

King’s Theatre, Leven Street, 10-12 Mar, £16.50-£25.50, 0131-529 6000

AGATHA CHRISTIE’S BLACK COFFEE

ROBERT Powell, best known for his portrayal of Christ in Franco Zefferelli’s Jesus of Nazareth, is the new Poirot. In Black Coffee, the first play written by Agatha Christie, a quintessential English country estate is thrown into chaos following the murder of an eccentric inventor.

Arriving at the estate just moments too late, one man immediately senses a potent brew of despair, treachery, and deception amid the estate’s occupants.

That man is Hercule Poirot.

King’s Theatre, Leven Street, 24-29 Mar, £14.50-£30, 0131-529 6000