Film posters put Edinburgh in focus

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From Christmas gifts embossed with your child’s handprints to Nike trainers complete with your own personal slogan, Christmas shopping this year is all about those little personal touches.

And even the art world is not immune, with a local graphic designer putting a very Edinburgh spin on some classic movies.

Designer Edd Wellesley-Davies' use of city landmarks puts a quirky Edinburgh twist on film posters. Picture: Jane Barlow

Designer Edd Wellesley-Davies' use of city landmarks puts a quirky Edinburgh twist on film posters. Picture: Jane Barlow

Edinburgh designer Edd Wellesley-Davies, 35, adapted original film posters to include famous landmarks from the Capital. Greats of the silver screen have been re-imagined as Edinburgh dramas, from the Bridge on the River Forth to The Rock – Castle Rock, that is.

And the quirky collection is proving a hit with shoppers, with hundreds of prints already sold at social enterprise ICE Store in the St James Centre.

He said: “The first one I did was the Bridge on the River Forth. It just popped into my head as an idea. I thought it worked quite well so I started the rest of the designs. They are a take on a real film poster paired with a local landmark. People seem to really like them.”

Painting graduate Edd, from Musselburgh, is often walking around the city in search of inspiration, and creates the designs by stripping the subject down to a simple shape. He uses his computer as a canvas, using a digital pen, computer effects and photographs to create the digital images.

“They each take about three or four days to do as it is the finishing touches that take the time, like researching the right trivia that fits in.

“I have a got a few ideas I’d like to try in the New Year. I’d really like to do a Leith postcard or poster so I’ll be knuckling down in the studio.”

ICE store director Joe Trodden set up the not-for-profit business to give independent artists and designers a place to showcase their work, and saw Edd’s work at the West End Fair during the summer.

He said: “It is doing really well. We can barely keep up with the demand. I think the key is that people who live in Edinburgh like Edinburgh and want a different slant on things. They have proven really popular so far. When I speak to people they say they have never seen anything like it before, it’s original.

“It is so hard to get the colours and transitions right in graffiti art. I think the whole range is superb.”