Forget Trainspotting, Teacup Travels fans flock to filming

Evie Brassington as Charlotte  and Kemaal Deen-Ellis as Lokesh  with actress Gemma Jones. Picture: Jon Savage
Evie Brassington as Charlotte and Kemaal Deen-Ellis as Lokesh with actress Gemma Jones. Picture: Jon Savage
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IT’S a hit TV show that has intrigued children across the country.

And as the filming of the second series of Teacup Travels got under way yesterday, fans flocked to Princes Street Gardens to watch the stars of the CBeebies phenomenon step in front of the camera.

Picture; Jon Savage

Picture; Jon Savage

Teacup Travels, created by Leith-based production company Plum Films, is a historical fiction programme for under fives that transforms the history of artefacts found in museums across Scotland into dramatic adventures.

Children posed for photographs in front of the Head Gardener’s cottage, which is shown in the television show as the home of Great Aunt Lizzie, played by BAFTA-winning actress Gemma Jones.

In the first series, two school children – Elliot and Charlotte – take turns of visiting their Great Aunt Lizzie, who tells them to pick a teacup from her cabinet with an ancient artefact on it.

As they drink their tea, they are immersed into an imaginary world and told the story of the artefact.

Picture; Jon Savage

Picture; Jon Savage

Tony Bibby, who devised Teacup Travels based on his own experience as a child, said it was great to see so many fans in Princes Street Gardens yesterday.

He said: “We’ve been touched by the feedback from the first series and it was lovely to see so many people stopping to have a look yesterday.

“It all came about based on my own experience as a child, and the stories my great aunt used to tell my sister and I.

“It’s all about discovery through adventure, we would just pick an object up and my great aunt would tell us a story about it. It’s a fun way of learning.”

The first series aired in February last year and its viewing figures topped over 550,000, according to BARB ratings. Filming for the second series, which will be aired just before Christmas, will also take place at Loretto School in Musselburgh.

Producers of the TV show have claimed since the launch of the programme, children have become more interested in museum artefacts.

Co-producer Simon Parsons said: “The beauty of our show is that each and every one of the 20 artefacts that appear in the new series, can be seen in real life in museums across the UK.

“We know how much kids love going to museums, so Teacup Travels opens the door to ancient history for little ones.”

From the first series, an Egyptian mirror featured in one of the episodes can be seen at the National Museum of Scotland, and Viking boat rivets from the second series can also be viewed there.

Susan Gray, communications manager at National Museums Scotland, said: “National Museums Scotland are working with Plum Films.

“We are delighted to help them bring the past to life for young children.”