Schoolgirl chops off 2ft-long locks

Sarah Martin's friend Emma Ezady finishes the job of cutting off the 17-year-old's flowing locks. Picture: Greg Macvean

Sarah Martin's friend Emma Ezady finishes the job of cutting off the 17-year-old's flowing locks. Picture: Greg Macvean

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SARAH Martin left her teachers in tears as she proved she is a cut above the rest.

The 17-year-old sacrificed her 24-inch locks so they can be transformed into wigs for children with cancer.

Sarah gets ready for the big chop

Sarah gets ready for the big chop

Pupils and staff – some of whom were overcome with emotion – watched on at ­Linlithgow Academy as Sarah had her head shaved.

It was the first time her hair – which will now be sent to the Little Princess Trust – had been snipped in two years.

The hair-raising experience also saw Sarah bring in more than £2000 for a second cancer charity.

“It feels so weird, I’ve not stopped feeling it. It’s so soft and will take so much less time to wash now,” she said. “The whole school packed into the hall, when I was going to cut the bobble off, and that’s when I thought ‘I’m really doing this’.

“I cut the pony tails but couldn’t do the second one as I broke my wrist. My friend Emma Ezady then cut the rest.

“It felt really strange but totally worth it to raise this much money for such good causes. People say I suit it, so that’s good news as well.” The charity provides real-hair wigs to boys and girls across the UK and Ireland who have lost their own locks through cancer treatment. Each donation has to be at least seven inches long and before being cut, the hair is plaited or braided to make it easy to post to the charity and keep it untangled.

It is then sent off in an envelope and used by specialist wig-makers who design and create various styles to suit each patient.

Nursery volunteer Sarah, who spent summer au-pairing in Switzerland, got the idea from her work with children.

When she leaves school next year, she wants to spend another 12 months overseas with a family before training to become a children’s nurse.

She decided the money raised at school and through her JustGiving page will go to Children with Cancer UK.

Mum Lucia, 46, a Marie Curie nurse, said: “I don’t think I could have done it at that age, especially in front of the whole school. We are very proud.”

Headteacher Karen Jarvis said students who could not fit into the hall were watching through the windows.

She said: “I think they were all quite in awe of what she was doing. She was composed throughout the whole thing, unlike many of the staff who were crying.”