Hit and run killer fights deportation

Edinburgh Sheriff Court heard how Dean used make up to flee the island. Picture: Greg Macvean

Edinburgh Sheriff Court heard how Dean used make up to flee the island. Picture: Greg Macvean

0
Have your say

A DRINK driver who fled Taiwan after being jailed for killing a paper boy in a hit and run collision has launched an appeal to avoid being deported from the UK.

Lawyers acting for Zain Dean, 33, went to the Court of Criminal Appeal in Edinburgh on Wednesday to stop him from being returned to the Far East.

Sheriff Kenneth Maciver ordered that Dean was to be returned to the island state following a hearing at Edinburgh Sheriff Court last year.

But Dean’s legal team claim that the deportation is illegal and that he should be allowed to remain in Scotland.

The businessman who is of Indian origins, claims he was framed by corrupt policemen when he was detained for the 2010 death of a newspaper vendor.

Edinburgh Sheriff Court heard how Dean used make up and the passport of a white friend to flee the island in August 2012. He then came to live at an exclusive property in the city’s new town before Scottish police arrested him in October 2013.

Dean, who is a British citizen, was arrested after knocking a paper boy off his scooter in Taipei in 2010.

The court heard that the newspaper delivery man later died from his injuries.

After the Supreme Court of Taiwan jailed Dean for four years for drink driving, he was able to flee the island state using the passport of a friend.

Dean, an ethnic Indian, is also said to have used make up to give himself the appearance of a white man which allowed him to leave the country.

Two people were later arrested and jailed for helping him flee the country.

Lawyers acting for Dean claim that he didn’t receive a fair trial in Taiwan and that their client was the victim of police corruption.

On Wednesday, Dean’s advocate Mungo Bovey QC addressed the court detailing legal reasons about why his client shouldn’t be forced to leave Scotland.

The appeal, which is expected to take two days, continues.