Indy camp protesters call for UN intervention

The independence camp outside the parliament. Pic: Greg Macvean

The independence camp outside the parliament. Pic: Greg Macvean

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INDEPENDENCE campaigners who are fighting a bid to evict them from their camp at the Scottish Parliament want the United Nations to monitor court proceedings.

Members of the so-called Sovereign Indigenous Peoples of Scotland want the UN to oversee proceedings at the Court of Session.

The members of that group have publicly stated that they intend to maintain their camp on the Parliament Campus until Scotland declares itself an independent state

The organisation believes that it has the right to assemble at the parliament because the grounds apparently belong to the Scottish people.

It also currently believes that Murray Tosh, a former Conservative member of the Scottish Parliament, owns the parliament complex. The group argue that this is wrong.

And it believes that Scottish judges may not give them a fair hearing because they are appointed by the government and are supposedly biased in favour of the state.

On Tuesday, the group’s David Patterson told judge Lord Glennie: “We would like to invite the United Nations to the court.”

The claims were made during a court hearing dealing with legal issues surrounding the corporate body’s attempts to have the group evicted.

The group set up an independence camp outside the Parliament in November and they are refusing to leave until Scotland is granted independence.

Holyrood bosses say the group’s partisan message is at odds with the parliament’s “politically neutral” position.

In legal documents submitted to the court, lawyers acting for the parliament’s corporate body outline the reasons why the group should be evicted.

One paragraph in the document read: “The members of that group have publicly stated that they intend to maintain their camp on the Parliament Campus until Scotland declares itself an independent state.

“It is uncertain whether (and if so when) that event will ever occur. As matters stand therefore, the stated intention of the members of the camp must be taken to evince the intention to occupy the parliament campus indefinitely.”

Between 20 to 30 supporters of the group came to court on Tuesday to witness proceedings.

Some of those present wore Scottish Resistance T-shirts. The Scottish Resistance are a group of protesters who sparked controversy last week after holding a demo outside the Tunnock’s Factory in Uddingston, Lanarkshire,.

The supporters of the group were told off in court after clapping at a comment made during proceedings by Lord Glennie.

The judge had been trying to clarify on what grounds the Scottish Parliament were trying to evict the protestors.

Lord Glennie said: “I drive past every morning and I don’t see any violence or vandalism.”

During proceedings, Mr Patterson claimed that the court didn’t have the jurisdiction to deal with the case because of alleged close links between the state and the judiciary.

He also told the court that the group believed it had the democratic right to protest outside the parliament.

He added: “We’re not causing harm to the general populace.”

Lord Glennie also asked Mr Patterson whether the group had considered applying for legal aid.

Mr Patterson replied that the group had hundreds of supporters and he would have to ask them for their views on the matter.

He added: “I will need to speak to the rest of the clan.”

Lord Glennie fixed a procedural hearing on the eviction case for March 9.

The camp will be allowed to remain at Holyrood in the meantime. Members of the group left the Court of Session shouting ‘freedom’.