Indy camp protesters plead not be evicted on ‘independence day’

Indycamp protesters maintain their vigil near the Scottish Parliament. Picture: Scott Taylor

Indycamp protesters maintain their vigil near the Scottish Parliament. Picture: Scott Taylor

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A GROUP of protesters who are camping outside the Scottish Parliament will tell a court why they shouldn’t be evicted on what would have been Independence Day.

Members of the Sovereign Indigenous Peoples of Scotland will use “God’s law” to argue their case at the Court of Session in Edinburgh on March 24.

The group are fighting attempts by Holyrood’s Corporate Body to obtain a court order forcing them to dismantle their camp.

Group members have pledged to remain outside the parliament until Scotland becomes independent.

One of them, called “David”, yesterday told Judge Lord Malcolm that the organisation believes the Corporate Body is acting illegally in its attempts to evict them.

He had objected to Lord Malcolm calling him “Mr Paterson”, and said: “We are the sons and daughters of Scotland.”

In a long submission, “David” told the judge his group wanted to be treated fairly.

He added: “The people demand equality.”

David was speaking as around 80 to 100 supporters of the camp came to hear the case in the Court of Session.

Long queues formed outside the court 40 minutes before the case called.

Supporters of the camp stood outside carrying Saltire flags.

Some people took a leaf out of the Tartan Army’s book and used the flags as capes. They stood beside bewigged QCs and advocates who were also wearing capes while they waited on their cases being called in other courts.

Many people didn’t gain admission because there wasn’t enough space in the court to accommodate all of them.

Lord Malcolm came to the bench and explained the hearing was a procedural one.

Advocate David Thomson, for the Scottish Parliament’s Corporate Body, told the court that he had received a document from the Sovereign Indigenous Peoples of Scotland.

The document contained 238 names of people who agreed with the group’s position.

However, Mr Thomson pointed out that these 238 people hadn’t supplied their home addresses.

He said the parliamentary body needed to have these addresses in case costs need to be recovered after the case is completed.

Everyone on the list had given their address as Holyrood.

“David” cited “God’s law” and asked for the names and addresses for the Scottish Parliament’s Corporate Body.

He said the indy campers needed this information to know what they were “up against”.

“David” also said that the Scotland Act didn’t have jurisdiction over the case and wanted to know what crime had been committed.

He also said that the campers would be happy for a debate to be set in the case.

David also told the court that he wanted to submit another motion once Lord Malcolm adjourned proceedings.

When Lord Malcolm said he couldn’t because the court had been adjourned, some people in the public galleries were heard muttering “fix”.

The case will next call at the Court of Session in Edinburgh on March 24.