Jack and Doris mark 65 years of marriage

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A couple who have lived in the Capital all their lives have celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary.

Jack Cairns met Doris Sellar after the war in 1948, with the couple marrying at the Charlotte Chapel in Rose Street on March 26, 1949.

Pictures from their wedding featured in the Evening News.

Both were born and bred in the Capital – Doris growing up in Jordan Lane, Morningside, while Jack lived in Currie.

Jack gained a joiner apprenticeship before heading off to war in 1939 to work as a Marconi marine radio officer with the Merchant Navy.

He was on the Atlantic convoys and described his time on the ships as “the best years of his life”.

Upon returning to Scotland, Jack went on to teach technical subjects at West Calder and James Gillespie’s high schools. Doris was a nursery nurse for more than 30 years, working in numerous nurseries in Edinburgh.

The couple’s daughter, Judith Renilson, said: “Mum was an incredibly talented dressmaker. She made all of our clothes when we were younger.

“She was also a great knitter and baker. Dad could make almost anything out of wood.”

Jack and Doris are committed Christians – Jack was a deacon – and have dedicated a lot of their time to Canty Bay Scout Camp, which is run through the Charlotte Chapel.

The Scout group is made up of young boys from the age of five years old to men aged 18, with the couple leading games and activities and camping trips during the summer months in Canty Bay, near North Berwick.

Later in their lives, Jack and Doris attended Kingdom Faith Training College together in West Sussex, which allowed them to further study Christianity.

The couple had two daughters – one pre-deceased them – and have three grandchildren – Michael, Luke and Paul.

They also have four great-grandchildren – Aaron, Noah, Ellie and Lydia.

Since last November, Jack and Doris have lived together at the Jubilee House Care Home in Polwarth Terrace.

Asked what the secret was to her parents’ successful marriage, Mrs Renilson said: “I think their faith would be one thing.

“At the time they married, marriage vows meant exactly what they said. They wouldn’t have thought any differently.”