Lawyer in court over Saughton Prison smuggling bid

The trial was heard at the High Court in Edinburgh. Picture: Paul Chappells

The trial was heard at the High Court in Edinburgh. Picture: Paul Chappells

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JURORS have watched film of a solicitor being detained outside a jail after allegedly trying to smuggle in mobile phones and drugs.

David Blair Wilson, 55, was seen on closed circuit television leaving Edinburgh Prison and getting into his car, only for an unmarked police vehicle to arrive and block his exit. Officers jumped out and took him into custody.

The High Court in Edinburgh heard that Blair Wilson had behaved strangely and had looked anxious and nervous as he reported to the jail’s reception area for a visit to a client.

Blair Wilson denies a series of charges, all said to have been committed on 6 October, 2011, at HMP Saughton, Stenhouse Road, Edinburgh. He has blamed someone else in a special defence of incrimination.

It is alleged that Blair Wilson attempted to introduce into a prison three mobile telephones, three SIM cards, two chargers and two earphones, all prohibited articles, by hiding them in a package and concealing the package in a folder.

The indictment claims that Blair Wilson also had drugs and tablets, including cannabis resin and diazepam, and ten plastic syringes concealed in a folder.

Graham Robertson, 25, a prison officer, said Blair Wilson was told that folders he was carrying would have to be scanned before he was allowed in to see an inmate. He was also asked if he had a mobile phone, which was not permitted in the jail.

“He became quite anxious looking. He began to fidget. His body language changed slightly,” said Mr Robertson.

He said he attributed the change in Blair Wilson’s demeanour to mention of scanning the folders, rather than the mobile phone.

Blair Wilson had said he was going back to his car to leave his phone, and was more relaxed when he returned. Also, his folders were thinner, added Mr Robertson.

Shown CCTV footage, the witness agreed with the defence counsel, Frances McMenamin, QC, that, in it, Blair Wilson did not look anxious and fidgeting as he had described.

The trial continues.