Look back at the Capital’s proud brewing history

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PRIDE was strong, the nation’s fingers were tightly crossed –Scotland had made it to the 1974 World Cup in West Germany.

The nation was awash in Saltires and Lion Rampants as supporters ­celebrated the football team’s achievement as the only British side to make it through to the competition.

Scotland football team manager Willie Ormond surrounded by workers when he collects the SFA cheques at Tennent Caledonian brewery in Edinburgh, in June 1974. Picture: TSPL

Scotland football team manager Willie Ormond surrounded by workers when he collects the SFA cheques at Tennent Caledonian brewery in Edinburgh, in June 1974. Picture: TSPL

At the Tennent Caledonian Brewery staff enjoyed some pre-World Cup excitement when team manager ­Willie Ormond, pictured above, arrived at the premises to collect £10,000 worth of cheques for the Scottish Football 
Association.

The money was distributed among the 22-player squad, the manager and two trainers, through a deal which saw Tennents use pictures of the team for the company’s marketing.

Quite what football fans in the 1970s would have thought of ditching their Tennents for locally produced beer made from herbs foraged in Leith will obviously now never be known. The concept is likely to raise a few surprised eyebrows nonetheless, but producers at The Vintage pub, on Henderson Street, are keen to give the tipple a go, introducing it this week ahead of their first birthday celebrations.

The Capital has a long, proud connection with brewing and – as this latest venture shows – continues to build on the tradition.

It looks like the tired soldiers from the 1st Battalion Royal Scots were just keen 
to get their hands on any beer back in June 1960 having completed a 140-mile march through the Lothians and Peebleshire. They are pictured on the previous page at the Murray’s Breweries, in Craigmillar, enjoying a few cool refreshments in the aftermath.