National Airshow takes off in the Capital

UK Jul 23 2016; Scotland's National Airshow at the National Museum of Flight in East Lothian. Red Arrows, 
 credit steven scott taylor / J P License
UK Jul 23 2016; Scotland's National Airshow at the National Museum of Flight in East Lothian. Red Arrows, credit steven scott taylor / J P License
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IF they were after jaw dropping action then they headed to the right place.

And in their thousands they did so, to the National Museum of Flight where crowds were dazzled by mesmerising plane stunts and fascinating aircraft history.

Famed for their awe-inspiring formations, precision flying and dramatic aerobatics, the Red Arrows returned to East Fortune on Saturday for their 52nd flying season, wowing crowds with every swoop and turn they made at Scotland’s National Airshow.

They were joined by Typhoon fighter aircraft, capable of flying at twice the speed of sound, and a Catalina flying boat, which was one of the most widely-used seaplanes of World War Two.

The Spitfire, arguably the world’s most successful fighter plane, was also at the show, attended by some 10,000 visitors.

The event celebrated a century of aviation.

Joining the line-up for the first time was the Swiss Air Force PC-7 Team in nine Pilatus PC-7 Turbo Trainers and the Norwegian Air Force Historic Squadron in a MiG 15 UTI and two de Havilland Vampires.

Steve McLean, General Manager at the National Museum of Flight, said he was “delighted” to welcome back the “ever popular” Red Arrows.

He said: “They performed as part of a stellar line-up featuring everything from iconic historic aircraft to marvels of modern aviation.

“Visitors to the airshow could also explore the museum, including two Second World War hangars which tell the stories of military and civil aviation over the past century.”

Other aircraft that entertained included the Black Cats Lynx helicopter formation team, a Fairey Swordfish biplane, a Stolp Starduster biplane and a Bucker Jungmann bi-plane.

The military airfield dates back to the First World War.