Nostalgia: A mountain of Murrayfield memories

Police escort a man wearing fake breasts from the Calcutta Cup clash in 1982; below, fans stay cool during the U2 gig in 1987

Police escort a man wearing fake breasts from the Calcutta Cup clash in 1982; below, fans stay cool during the U2 gig in 1987

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THE famous home of Scottish rugby could be set for an invasion of football fans after bosses suggested it could become the home of the Tartan Army.

As the SFA looks at its options for Hampden in the next five years – and admitted it may seek to leave the wide expanse of the Glasgow stadium – bosses at the SRU said they would open the doors of Murrayfield to the round-ball game.

The stadium has already hosted some memorable nights of European football for fans of Hearts and Celtic, and as stadium bosses look to cut their £11 million debts they said they were open to the idea of football being played there.

The move would no doubt mean more colourful scenes and memories good and bad at the ground. In January 1982, the crowd were entertained not just by Scotland playing England but by a pitch invasion by a man sporting a pair of fake breasts, who was quickly escorted away by police.

The venue has hosted far more than just sport, of course. In May 1982, the faithful from across the country piled into Murrayfield in their thousands to welcome Pope John Paul II during his state visit to Scotland, while in August 1987, stewards had to throw buckets of water over the sweltering fans trying to keep cool at a U2 concert.

In July 1978, the stadium played host to a Jehovah’s Witnesses rally, and local children were able to enjoy an ice-cream outside.

The stadium has also been a place of protest, memorably in 1969 when an anti-apartheid demonstration was organised outside as Scotland played South Africa.