Nostalgia: Boom with a view

Janet and Jennifer Allman sit atop Mons Meg in 1960; below, tourists enjoy the view from the Castle ramparts in 1984

Janet and Jennifer Allman sit atop Mons Meg in 1960; below, tourists enjoy the view from the Castle ramparts in 1984

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IT is the world’s most famous medieval gun and always gets a special mention every December 31 as the Capital brings in Hogmanay.

And this week the six-tonne cannon, which dates back to the 15th century, has been returned to Edinburgh Castle after a facelift.

The cannon had been away from its home for the first time in 30 years but is now back in its rightful place.

Over the past two months, Mons Meg underwent extensive renovation work using a range of conservation techniques, including 3D scanning and bead blasting, before being carefully repainted.

And the cannon has been welcomed back with open arms by its managers – and its adoring public.

Visitors travel from all over the world to see the famous historical icon and have their photographs

taken beside the striking landmark.

Twins Janet and Jennifer Allman were even lucky enough to get their photograph taken sitting on the medieval cannon back in October 1960 – something today’s conservationists might not be too keen on.

But those keen to ensure Mons Meg’s conservation have no need to worry – the cannon has been well looked after over the years.

In 1985, she was removed from the Castle and transported all the way to the Armouries of the Tower of London to undergo extensive research – waved off by a group of passing Welsh rugby fans.

And in January 1981, she was carefully removed from her vantage point and taken to the North British Steel Group’s works at Armadale, also for testing.

But for now she remains at home to be enjoyed by all.