Nostalgia: Hat’s the way we were

The crowd at Easter Road in 1959; below, dressed up in top hat and tails for the 1987 Bo'ness Fair
The crowd at Easter Road in 1959; below, dressed up in top hat and tails for the 1987 Bo'ness Fair
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THE Capital was all about looking splendid in the very finest headgear this week, as the hit musical Top Hat came to town.

And away from the stage lights primary seven pupils from Craiglockhart Primary School asked the entire school to wear a hat of their choice recently, to raise money for the Sick Kids ­Hospital.

The resulting array of brightly coloured woollen caps, Angry Bird hats and little seal pup head-wear made for a bright and cosy display, but given the famously changeable weather in the Capital it’s hardly surprising to learn that hats of all shapes and sizes have long been one of the must-have accessories for any sensible resident.

The collection of flat caps, peaks and even the occasional bunnet certainly made the crowd at Easter Road in April 1959, and seem considerably smarter than their modern counterparts as they cheered on the team on a typically chilly day.

And the top hat and tails being modelled by youngsters from Bo’ness ahead of the local fair in June 1987 were a long way from the usual school uniforms.

Hats were so popular in 1963 that the Cramond ­Labour Party jumble sale held at Murrayfield in April 1963, even had its own hat stand.

In 1956, the Davy Crockett fashion was all the rage, with men thinking nothing of wandering Princes Street in a Davy Crockett cap made from raccoon skin and a fur coat.

And when a group of orphans visited the German ­sailing ship Gorch Foch at Leith in September 1963, little J Finlayson was given a chance to try on the hat of cadet J Spohr.