Nostalgia: Life along the waterfront

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EDINBURGH’S waterways play an important part of city life, and always have done.

Residents and visitors flock to the natural tourist attractions to take in the sights, relax and enjoy some water sports.

Ronnie Rusack turns on the water cascade into the River Almond from the Union Canal aqueduct at Ratho in March 1987. Picture: TSPL

Ronnie Rusack turns on the water cascade into the River Almond from the Union Canal aqueduct at Ratho in March 1987. Picture: TSPL

The Union Canal, which runs all the way from Falkirk to Edinburgh, offers a host of activities for people to enjoy.

Along the 32-mile stretch, people can take part in activities including fishing, boating, cycling and of course walking.

In August 1983, the Honourable Society of Edinburgh Boaters arranged a Festival Regatta on the canal.

Seven-year-old Rebecca Wimberley and Sue Braddley were photographed dressed in Edwardian clothes, being punted along by Dr Eamon Hyde.

Dressing up for events along the Union Canal is a common theme.

In 1987, Anne Nelson and Hildur Copley dressed up as “serving wenches” to promote special canal cruises which took place that summer.

Ronnie Rusack, manager of The Bridge Inn, Ratho, turned on the water cascade into the River Almond from the canal aqueduct as part of the spectacle.

Volunteers gave up their time one Sunday back in July 1977 to help clean up the Lochrin basin section of the canal.

The stretch of water was filled with the industrial debris of 100 years, but more than 30 willing workers rolled up their sleeves to help with the mammoth task.

The canal has even provided entertainment to children and families when frozen.

In February 1956, skaters ignored the dangers and took to the frozen Union Canal at Meggetland