Nostalgia: Lives less ordinary in the Leith

Indras the elephant at Leith Public Library as part of a campaign to remind people to return their books in January 1976.

Indras the elephant at Leith Public Library as part of a campaign to remind people to return their books in January 1976.

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IT IS an area rich in history with a passionate population proud to be associated with the port.

Leith: famous for its naval heritage and Easter Road football team, as well as many a famous face throughout the centuries.

The entire workforce of Henry Robb shipyard, threatened with more than 400 redundancies, marched through Leith in 1983.

The entire workforce of Henry Robb shipyard, threatened with more than 400 redundancies, marched through Leith in 1983.

And no prouder were fans of its most well-known duo, The Proclaimers, this week when their music was celebrated on the international stage with the premiere of Sunshine on Leith at the Toronto Film ­Festival.

The film version of the stage production, inspired by the music of brothers Craig and Charlie Reid, will also be shown in the UK in Edinburgh next week. Fans are hoping for the standing ovation the movie received in Canada.

As these pictures show, The Proclaimers take a place in the proud time line of Leith, a neighbourhood perhaps best known across the world for its docks.

Pictured here in September 1969, the 3800-tonne coastal tanker Port-Tudy was launched from the port, joining a long line of ships to have docked at and sailed from the Leith shores.

That month saw a £1 million order announced by the Leith-based shipbuilding group Robb Caledon for a 7700-tonne tanker for French owners Soflumar of Paris.

Offering another snapshot in to the lives of Leithers from yesteryear is this one here from March 1973 taken at the steamie on Bonnington Road. That year saw Edinburgh Corporation spend £38,000 on automating the service, which opened its doors in 1927.

And what better way to show the passion of Leithers than through this picture from 1983 when the entire workforce from Henry Robb shipyard marched through Leith to raise public support against job cuts at the company.

MEMORIES: Proud Leithers prove to have a passion for their home

1: Indras the elephant at Leith Public Library as part of Edinburgh City Libraries’ campaign to remind people to return their books in January 1976

2: Staunch Hibbies Craig Reid and Charlie Reid, better known as The Proclaimers, pose in Hibs’ new football strip with John Collins in June 1989;

3: The 3800-ton Port-Tudy is launched from Leith Docks

4: The entire workforce (850 people) of Henry Robb shipyard, threatened with more than 400 redundancies, marched through Leith in April 1983, to raise public support for their fight to save jobs

5: Women doing their laundry in the steamie at Bonnington Road, which was due to be automated in March 1973