Nostalgia: Remembrance Day down the years

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It is a time to stop and think; a moment of emotional reflection observed across the city and beyond.

On the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month – the end of the First World War in 1918 – we take time to remember the servicemen and women who have devoted their lives to serving our country, many paying the ultimate sacrifice for their unwavering dedication.

Crowds pay their respects at the Stone of Remembrance outside the City Chambers in November 1968. Below, veterans dip their flags for fallen comrades in 1989

Crowds pay their respects at the Stone of Remembrance outside the City Chambers in November 1968. Below, veterans dip their flags for fallen comrades in 1989

As tradition dictates, our Remembrance Day services will take place tomorrow, with events being held across the Lothians, the UK and indeed the world.

Back in 1968, too young to remember but old enough to understand, two young girls added symbolic poppies to wreaths laid at the Remembrance Sunday service at the City Chambers. In what was the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Armistice which ended the First World War, more than 300 people attended the parade and service at the Stone of Remembrance on the High Street.

In 1989, despite heavy downpours, soldiers and veterans joined city officials, politicians and the public at exactly the same spot where they observed a two-minute silence in honour of the fallen.

Such scenes have been repeated throughout the decades in Edinburgh, and will be again tomorrow in a city with a proud military history as well as close links to the Scottish Poppy Appeal, the charity which supports ex-service people. Pictured here in October 1952, Earl Haig visited the Lady Haig’s Poppy Factory in the Canongate – now on Warriston Road – where men disabled during battle were employed.