Obituary: Bridget Nicoll, 100

Bridget Nicoll died a few weeks after celebrating her 100th birthday with friends and family
Bridget Nicoll died a few weeks after celebrating her 100th birthday with friends and family
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TRIBUTES have been paid to a Lothians great-great grandmother who passed away shortly after her 100th birthday.

Bridget Nicoll, of Broxburn, celebrated her centenary just last month but died a few weeks later.

The West Lothian mother-of-five lived through two world wars and saw the rise and fall of communism.

Mrs Nicoll moved to Broxburn in her teens after leaving the family home in Achill Island, County Mayo, Ireland.

She worked on farms across Scotland where she met her husband-to-be Alfred.

The couple were married for 70 years and went on to have five children, Annie, John, William, Freddie and Delia.

The couple enjoyed a long and happy marriage but sadly Mr Nicol passed away shortly after the landmark anniversary.

Her daughter, Annie McNamara, said her mother loved her family and enjoyed her grandchildren, great grandchildren and great-great grandchildren.

She said: “She was a hard-working woman. She came from Ireland in her teens with her friends and worked on farms, picking potatoes.

“She met my father who was from Perthshire and they moved to Broxburn and ended up staying there. She later got a job in the kitchen of Bangour hospital. She was always working hard.”

Mrs Nicoll lived in Broxburn Nursing Home for the last nine years of her life.

Mrs McNamara said her mother enjoyed her time in the home and praised the dedication of staff.

She said: “The people in the nursing home were brilliant. They did so much. We used to go up to see her every day.”

Mrs McNamara said her mother thrived among her family and would be sadly missed. She had celebrated her 100th birthday on December 10 but passed away on January 10.

Mrs McNamara said: “We buried her on Saturday, it was heart breaking.

“But there are a lot of good memories. The family used to go and see her in the home and the great grandchildren used to go in and jump on the bed for a cuddle.

“That always made her day. She loved her family. She always did her best for us and she loved all her grandchildren, great grandchildren and great-great grandchildren.”

“She was a cheery person – everybody would always get a cup of tea in her house.

“She really liked a laugh and she loved her family very much.”