Obituary: John Scott, architect, 85

John Scott's work was recognised with multiple building awards
John Scott's work was recognised with multiple building awards
0
Have your say

ONE of the architects behind the new town of Livingston has died at the age of 85.

John Scott passed away in Edinburgh on March 12.w

With his company Exposagg – which he founded in 1964 – John was at the heart of the construction of the new town of Livingston for two years.

Upon retiring, he became a part-time lecturer at Heriot-Watt University.

John was born and raised in Glasgow, graduating from Strathclyde University in 1951 with an Honours degree in building and civil engineering.

He was founder of the Scottish Romanian Universities Exchange, which provided funds for students to study in the Capital. Dr Ion Jinga, the Romanian ambassador to the UK, had his letter read out to the hundreds gathered at John’s funeral service at Greyfriars.

It said: “John Scott meant a lot to me and my wife, Daniela. He was a fantastic support for developing academic relations between Romanian and Scottish universities, and also in offering his energy into the accomplishment of noble causes.

“I remember the warm welcome he organised during my visit to Edinburgh in 2010, as well as the interesting and inspiring talks we had on several occasions.

“I will miss him a lot – his advice and suggestions, his touching personality and character. His departure is a great loss for the academic community and his friends.”

John never lost his love for Glasgow but he also appreciated Edinburgh’s fine dining, and loved a good debate. He often contributed to newspaper letters pages and, in the past few years, had campaigned against the structure of the new grandstands for the Edinburgh Tattoo.

His career began at Glasgow architect FA McDonald and Partners more than 60 years ago, before he became a senior engineer with the Scottish Gas Board between 1953 and 1964.

He began a new adventure in Zambia in 1984, building houses for the National Housing Authority there. This project helped home Zambians and refugees from Angola and Mozambique.

John’s work was recognised with multiple awards. Exposagg won a Concrete Society Award in 1971, and he personally received a Certificate of Excellence for Mature Structures in 2000, as well as being awarded the Institution of Structural Engineers Scottish Branch Services Award in the same year. He was also recognised by the institution in 2004, gaining one of its most prestigious honours – the Lewis Kent award for personal services.

In addition, he was given an Excellency Diploma by the University of Timisoara.

John is survived by five nieces and three nephews who loved him dearly as an uncle as well as a friend and an inspirational person, too.