Comment: Who would want to run a Capital city?

Adam McVey. left, and Labour group leader Cammy Day sign the coalition agreement at the City Chambers. Picture: Greg Macvean
Adam McVey. left, and Labour group leader Cammy Day sign the coalition agreement at the City Chambers. Picture: Greg Macvean
5
Have your say

Drawing lots to decide who gets some senior jobs.

The Greens and the Tories lining up on the same side to defeat the SNP and Labour. Welcome to the strange world of local politics in Edinburgh in 2017.

In reality, the arcane rules that lead to lots being drawn to decide who would be convener of certain council committees are unlikely to be called on again any time soon. However, the fact that the political parties reached a stand-off in trying to make one of their first decisions shows just how finely balanced the City Chambers are now.

That is why some on the Labour side were reluctant to join a coalition which will not always find it easy to get its way.

The big fear in that you step up to take responsibility for running the city but end up doing little other than delivering cuts imposed on you by central government. Why do that when at the same time you have a limited ability to push through your own big ideas?

Local government right now is in many ways a thankless job.

The real hope comes in the shape of the City Deal. If it delivers more powers to the city to raise its own taxes, perhaps in the form of a tourist levy, then the picture becomes quite different.