Paxman show rating changes over ‘expletives’

The rating for Jeremy Paxman's one-man show was changed from 'universal' to 'parental guidance' because it is said to contain several expletives. Picture: Getty

The rating for Jeremy Paxman's one-man show was changed from 'universal' to 'parental guidance' because it is said to contain several expletives. Picture: Getty

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FESTIVAL-GOERS who have booked tickets to Jeremy Paxman’s one-man show at the Edinburgh Fringe have been offered a refund – if they aren’t comfortable with bad 
language.

It comes as the status of veteran broadcaster’s August show shifted from a “universal” rating, meaning anyone can attend, to a “parental guidance” rating because of expected swearing in the performance.

The 64-year-old former Newsnight presenter, who has been known to let slip a few expletives on air in the past, is performing his show, called Paxo, at the Pleasance Cabaret Bar from August 18-25.

Those who have already bought tickets have been offered a refund if they feel their ears might be a bit delicate for the show.

Confirming the change in rating, an Edinburgh 
Festival spokesman said: “The age guideline has changed, as the performance contains several expletives.”

Those who attend Paxo will have the opportunity to “quiz the grand inquisitor” and give him a taste of life on the receiving end.

However it appears his responses may be somewhat crude with a show spokesman insisting they were “erring on the side of caution” by issuing the parental guidance warning.

Speaking shortly after announcing his Fringe debut, Jeremy Paxman said: “Some fool said you only regret the things in life that you don’t do, but I’m regretting this already.”

Show director Sarah Esdaile was more optimistic about the much-anticipated performance.

She said: “I am looking forward very much to harnessing Jeremy’s positive mental attitude and giving our audiences in Edinburgh a little insight into the enigmatic Mr Paxman and what makes him tick.”

A row over blue language at the Fringe erupted in 2012 when organisers were accused of implementing a “draconian” policy on several acts’ advertising billboards.

Rude words appearing in titles of shows and promotional blurb written by comedians were censored in the Fringe’s official listings section.

Festival veteran Richard Herring complained when an asterisk was added to the title of his show.

Mr Herring said the policy had “serious repercussions for artistic freedom”.

Meanwhile stand-up comedian Stuart Goldsmith was furious when an exclamation mark was added to the title of his show, which he said had the potential to lose him ticket sales because it would be missed in internet 
searches.

david.oleary@edinburghnews.com