Andy Warhol exhibition set for Holyrood

From left, Angus Hogg, Carnegie UK Trust; Eric Shiner of the Andy Warhol Museum and Tricia Marwick MSP, pictured with Warhol's Andrew Carnegie. Picture: contributed

From left, Angus Hogg, Carnegie UK Trust; Eric Shiner of the Andy Warhol Museum and Tricia Marwick MSP, pictured with Warhol's Andrew Carnegie. Picture: contributed

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HE once said, “In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes”.

So legendary pop art icon Andy Warhol would no doubt approve of a major new Edinburgh exhibition expected to be so busy visitors will have to book individual time slots.

More than 25,000 people are expected to descend on the Scottish Parliament to see works by the eccentric New York-based blond being exhibited in Scotland for the first time.

Scottish Parliament presiding officer Tricia Marwick said: “This is the first politically curated exhibition of Andy Warhol’s work and the first time his works have ever been shown in a legislature and so represents a real coup for the Scottish Parliament.

“The Scottish Parliament is not just a place for politicians. Our building is home to many events and exhibitions that get people talking and thinking about issues that matter to them.

“This unique exhibition will offer people the chance to explore the role of power and politics within the home of debate in Scotland and I am grateful to the Carnegie UK Trust and The Andy Warhol Museum for making it possible.”

More than 40 of Warhol’s works, including his iconic portraits of Lenin, Mao Tse-tung and the Queen, will be on show in a ground-floor committee room that is being given over to the exhibition. Time slots will be allocated in advance to help manage anticipated numbers. Also on display will be a portrait of a devilish Richard Nixon and famous screen prints about the assassination of John F Kennedy, on show just a few weeks before the 50th anniversary of his shooting in Dallas, Texas.

The exhibition, entitled Andy Warhol: Pop, Power and Politics, has been gifted by the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh to recognise the centenary of the Carnegie UK Trust.

The parliament has set up a dedicated ticket phone line and, in a quirky twist, people have to call 0131 348 5454 and reference the famous New York nightclub, Studio 54, which Warhol frequented regularly during the 70s and 80s. Tickets for the free four-week exhibition which opens on October 5 will be available for booking from tomorrow.

From soup tins to Elvis

BORN Andrew Warhola in Pittsburgh, in 1928, Andy Warhol’s parents had emigrated to the USA from what is now the Slovak Republic.

He worked in New York as a commercial artist and in the 1960s produced works such as the famous Campbell’s soups tins and his distinctive Pop Art portraits of Marilyn Monroe, Jackie Kennedy and Elvis Presley. His fame spread in the 1970s and 1980s. But he died unexpectedly in 1987 following a gall bladder operation.