FMQs: Sturgeon apologises for "worst possible" train breakdown

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon will explore offering abortion access to women in Northern Ireland. Picture: Greg Macvean
First Minister Nicola Sturgeon will explore offering abortion access to women in Northern Ireland. Picture: Greg Macvean
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Nicola Sturgeon today apologised to thousands of Scots communters for mayhem caused by a train breakdown in the "worst place" in the country.

The First Minister told MSPs at Holyrood she has held talks with ScotRail chiefs this morning and transport minister Humza Yousaf about the chaos after the breakdown of the Edinburgh-Glasgow train between Waverley and Haymarket stations in the capital this morning.

Kezia Dugdale hit out at "another shambles" on Scotland's railways

Kezia Dugdale hit out at "another shambles" on Scotland's railways

And the SNP leader again repeated her threat to strip Dutch firm Abellio of the ScotRail contract if the service continues to deteriorate.

"The Government accepts responsibility in this matter," Ms Sturgeon said at First Minister Questions today.

"I repeat the apology caused by this extraordinary set of circumstances."

READ MORE: Commuter chaos as ScotRail trains to Glasgow are cancelled

The 6.55am Edinburgh to Glasgow Central came to a standstill at Haymarket following a brake fault. The faulty train was moved from the tracks at 8.36am.

The First Minister said ScotRail chiefs told her in a conference call it was the "worst place in the country for a breakdown like this to happen."

It mean trains travelling into the capital from across the country were hit by delays of up to an hour. The service was largely back to normal by mid-day.

The disruption were branded "another shambolic day" on Scotland's rail network by Labour leader Kezia Dugdale who said it had been "misery" for passengers.

The Labour leader insisted the delays were an everyday experience for rail passengers, with one five trains across the country running later yesterday.

Ms Sturgeon insisted an "improvement plan" was in place for ScotRail, but ministers had the option of ending the contract if performance continues to decline - including the option of a publicly-owned company taking over the franchise.