Residents enjoy Jubilee festivities

Lothian & Borders Police horse Fusilier joined in the celebrations
Lothian & Borders Police horse Fusilier joined in the celebrations
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A FINAL day of celebrations took place across the Capital as the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee weekend drew to a close.

From nursery games to street parties for people of all ages, city residents turned out in their thousands for the final day of events marking the monarch’s 60 years of service to the nation.

Wester Coates Nursery, Edinburgh held a party in the nursery gardens.

Wester Coates Nursery, Edinburgh held a party in the nursery gardens.

In London, the day was celebrated by an RAF fly past, 60-gun salute and a carriage procession, but for people in Edinburgh, the focus was on using the milestone to cement a sense of belonging and identity in the city’s children.

“I think for a child to turn out as a citizen who can contribute, they have to have an idea of where they come from and where they are going,” said Alison Hawkins, headteacher at Wester Coates Nursery, where the children enjoyed games, races and face painting, and made their own bunting for the day.

“That’s why this event was so important. Through it they have learnt about the make-up of their country.

“We also spent a long time making our own bunting and making paper chains. Through helping themselves, the children were also learning how to recycle and they were involved in their immediate community.”

Elsewhere in the Capital, the Jubilee celebrations became an opportunity to build on community bonds.

Mother-of-two Elizabeth Grieve, 44, who helped organise a street party for about 60 people in Braid Crescent, said: “I was really surprised by the turnout. I think it meant a lot to us that it was held in honour of the Queen. It’s her longevity of service and the fact she has never put a foot wrong – she’s an example to us all.

“We are a friendly street but it was so nice to see people who you do not see often and have the opportunity to have a chat with them.”

The sense of community created by the day’s events was shared by residents and their friends in Edinburgh’s Weavers Knowe Crescent.

“One of the reasons we wanted to do something was because we felt it was a really important historic occasion,” said organiser Nicola Brisley, 44.

“We have a lot of young families who have come into the street in the last five years and it was simply a fantastic opportunity for people to get to know each other.”