Snapshot of photography in the Capital

Performers promote Professor Crump's Edinburgh Festival Fringe show on Princes Street in September 1978 included a stilt-walker, and though locals ignore him a tourist takes a photograph. Picture: TSPL
Performers promote Professor Crump's Edinburgh Festival Fringe show on Princes Street in September 1978 included a stilt-walker, and though locals ignore him a tourist takes a photograph. Picture: TSPL
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THESE days everyone’s a photographer.

We take photos routinely during our day-to-day lives, from pictures of meals we’ve just cooked to “selfies”, we snap them on our phones, instantly edit them, then upload them to the internet.

The same thought process and effort that once went into capturing the perfect picture does not apply to today’s band of would-be snappers.

If a photo looks rubbish, it is simply deleted and instantly forgotten about.

Gone are the days where we handed in spools and waited eagerly for a week or so until our holiday snaps came back developed, with half of them suffering from over-exposure or cropped-off heads.

But back in 1978, when a tourist captured the spectacle of stilt-walker Paul Goddard on Princes Street during the Fringe Festival in 1978, he had to hope that his camera techniques were up to scratch in order to produce that perfect snap when developed.

Developing techniques used to be taught in schools, with pupils learning the dark room skills required to get photos from spool to frame. These pupils at Lindsay High School in Bathgate looked deep in thought in March 1958.

While doing something as brazen as hanging out your car window to take a photo would land you with a hefty fine these days, one motorist seemed more than happy to do whatever it took to capture the perfect shot of the pipe band procession heading along Princes Street during the Festival in 1966.

And trainspotters had their cameras at the ready when the Flying Scotsman pulled into Waverley in April 1966.