Tartan terror suspect Adam Busby to be extradited

It is alleged that Busby claimed bombs would detonate at the Forth Road Bridge. Picture: Toby Williams
It is alleged that Busby claimed bombs would detonate at the Forth Road Bridge. Picture: Toby Williams
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A man dubbed the “Tartan Terrorist” is to be extradited back to Scotland to face charges including allegations he telephoned the Evening News threatening to bomb the Forth Road Bridge.

• Claims Busby threatened to contaminate the drinking water of major UK towns and cities

• Allegations that messages stated poisonous package sent to then-PM Gordon Brown.

The High Court in Dublin has ruled that Adam Busby, 64, should be sent back to face charges relating to the 
telephoning of hoax bomb warnings and poison threats.

He is also alleged to have made the threats to various Scottish newspapers and agencies between November 2009 and June 2010.

Busby, who has multiple sclerosis and is confined to a wheelchair, was arrested a year ago. He had contested the extradition on the basis that the alleged offences were committed outside of the UK and he was resident in Ireland at the time.

But Mr Justice John Edwards made an order for the surrender of Busby under the European Arrest Warrant Act and remanded him in custody at Cloverhill Prison, Dublin, until he is sent back to Scotland.

Busby is facing seven charges, one of which carries a life sentence.

The charges allege that Busby, purporting to be from the Scottish Liberation Army, called The Scottish Sun newspaper in Glasgow on September 27, 2009, and threatened to contaminate the drinking water of major UK towns and cities.

The organisation’s objective was to establish a separate socialist Scottish state outside the European Union. 
On December 20, 2009, it is alleged that he sent the same newspaper a text message claiming that various packages containing caustic and poisonous substances had been sent to public figures, including then-PM Gordon Brown.

Other charges allege that on April 15, 2010 Busby telephoned the Press Association and the Samaritans in Glasgow claiming that bombs would detonate at the Argyll Arcade and the Hilton Hotel in the city.

On June 9, 2010 it is alleged that he telephoned the Evening News, the Scottish Daily Express and The Scottish Sun, claiming that bombs would detonate at the Forth Road Bridge and the Erskine Bridge.

Busby left Scotland in the mid-1980s to live in Dublin. He argued that he would face a much higher penalty in the UK than if he were prosecuted in Ireland.

But Mr Justice Edwards said that the fact that he was going to be exposed to a higher penalty in Scotland would not constitute an abuse of process.

He added: “What was done, if done as alleged, was intended to terrorise.”

Busby is also at the centre of an extradition fight in the United States. He is wanted by US authorities in connection with a series of hoax bomb threats which rattled the University of Pittsburgh campus during the spring of 2012.

US Attorney David J Hickton said: “We remain interested in extraditing Adam Busby to hold him responsible for the indicted crimes here and have taken active steps to secure his presence. We stand in line behind Scotland, which has a prior interest and rights to proceed with Mr Busby for crimes committed there.”

It remains unclear why the University of Pittsburgh was targeted.