Total Warrior: Competitors brave brutal course

The obstacles present a number of challenges. Picture: Lisa Ferguson
The obstacles present a number of challenges. Picture: Lisa Ferguson
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IT’S the gruelling obstacle race that sees participants leap over fire, crawl under barbed-wire and even face down electrocution.

Total Warrior came to Scotland for the first time ever over the weekend as 3500 people tackled the punishing challenge at Balgone Estate in East Lothian.

There's no easy way out. Picture: Lisa Ferguson

There's no easy way out. Picture: Lisa Ferguson

Fearless contestants from 16 different countries pitted themselves against 31 separate obstacles in a bid to come out on top – with more than a few falling along the way.

Our own Clare Smith battled the course - How did she do?

The exhausting 12km route featured everything from towering cargo-net climbs to ice-cold water plunges to floating pontoons, before finishing off with a giant, 30-metre long water slide.

Organiser David Gaffney hailed the “fantastic” atmosphere as more than 1000 spectators turned up to cheer on their family and friends over the course of Saturday and Sunday - with a range of different abilities and charitable causes represented.

There was no shortage of mud. Picture: Lisa Ferguson

There was no shortage of mud. Picture: Lisa Ferguson

He said: “It’s been fantastic – it’s just been a great weekend. The feedback has been overwhelmingly positive. The farmer himself – the guy who owns the land – ran in the race on Sunday morning.

“Thankfully, it all seemed to go fairly smoothly. We always tend to get a few strains and scrapes and stuff like that but we obviously look after health and safety – every obstacle is designed to be challenging but safe.”

Mr Gaffney insisted the backbreaking event’s growing appeal lay in its ability to unleash the inner child.

“It’s all the stuff you do instinctively as a kid, that comes so naturally, but once you reach a certain age these things are not socially acceptable any more,” he said. “I guess we are giving people that excuse to let go and do these things again.

Picture: Lisa Ferguson

Picture: Lisa Ferguson

“There’s a whole range of things people do it for and there’s a whole range of abilities. It’s something that everybody can do with a bit of hard work beforehand. There’s a good chunk of our participants who completely rely on other people in their teams to get them round.

“Once they are out there, there’s just this camaraderie that suddenly appears. Everybody wants to help each other. The atmosphere out there on the course is just brilliant.”

Since 2011, more than 40,000 people have competed in Total Warrior’s sell-out events in Leeds and the Lake District.

Picture: Lisa Ferguson

Picture: Lisa Ferguson