Disbelief as pavements blocked by new 20mph signage

New signs have gone up.  some of them in the middle of pavements.  Like this one in Braehead Road. .
New signs have gone up. some of them in the middle of pavements. Like this one in Braehead Road. .
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CITY chiefs have come under fresh fire over the Capital’s 20mph rollout after pedestrians found their path blocked by signs put up in the middle of the pavement.

Transport officials have now agreed to moved a number of the new signs after they were branded a “danger” to local residents, particularly those with reduced mobility.

The sign on Cramond Road North, which has been moved... behind a tree.

The sign on Cramond Road North, which has been moved... behind a tree.

It comes just hours before the scheme’s third phase – covering roads in the west of the city – is due to come into force tomorrow.

Kevin Lang, Lib Dem councillor for Almond ward, said he had seen several signs in the middle of pavements, including on Cramond Road North, Braehead Road and Avon Road.

Cllr Lang said a number of constituents had contacted him about the issue, voicing particular concern for those in wheelchairs or with buggies.

He said: “In a community like Cramond where there are several retirement homes and a lot of older people it obviously causes real concern when you have pavements which are there for pedestrians [but] people have to go on roads to get round signs. Why they were positioned there in the first place completely flies in the face of common sense.

Signs have been erected ahead of the third phase of the 20mph rollout

Signs have been erected ahead of the third phase of the 20mph rollout

“In a way these kind of mistakes you could understand a bit more if it was at the beginning of the process but this is more than a year on from the start of 20mph so you would really expect these kind of issues not to arise.”

He said residents had also been left “thoroughly confused” by conflicting signage, citing a junction where a “20” had been painted on the ground only to be positioned immediately adjacent to a 30mph sign.

“It’s very frustrating that we are seeing these problems literally with hours to go until the phase three rollout starts,” he added.

“[But] the one that causes me most concern is that signs are being put up right in the middle of pavements causing access problems.

“Given that this whole project was meant to be about the safety of pedestrians these problems are running completely counter to that.”

Phase three’s arrival will see a further 120 miles of road converted to the new limit which, once fully rolled out, will cover 80 per cent of the city.

Stuart Hay, director of Living Streets Scotland, said he supported the scheme but added: “Blocking pavements is unacceptable. Pavements must always be kept clear for pedestrians, especially those with buggies or with mobility issues. The council must clamp down on its careless contractors.”

Transport convener Lesley Macinnes said the initiative was “better for everyone,” adding: “First and foremost, it’s far safer, with anyone hit at 20mph seven times more likely to survive than someone struck at 30mph.

“It’s quieter, too, and helps people feel more comfortable walking and cycling.”

A council spokesman added: “We are aware that there are some remedial works required and we will ensure that these are carried out as soon as possible.”

florence.snead@jpress.co.uk