Edinburgh University postgrad facing deportation to China

Chennan Fei lived in Glasgow before studying for a masters degree at the University of Edinburgh. Picture: Neil Hanna
Chennan Fei lived in Glasgow before studying for a masters degree at the University of Edinburgh. Picture: Neil Hanna
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A Chinese woman who earned a masters degree from Edinburgh University during her 15 years in Scotland is now facing deportation.

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Chennan Fei came to Scotland on her parents’ student visa when she was 13 and had been living in Glasgow, ever since.

The 28-year-old attended high schools in Glasgow and later graduated with a Masters degree in Accounting and Business Management from Edinburgh University - funded by her parents.

Unbeknown to Chennan, who is estranged from her parents, the visa expired a few years later.

She was detained and taken to Dungavel Immigration Removal Centre in Strathaven, South Lanarkshire. She has since been transferred to Yarl’s Wood Immigration Removal Centre in Milton Ernest, Bedfordshire, and is now awaiting deportation.

Friends and MSPs are now campaigning to stop Chennan from being deported and allow her to return back to her Scottish boyfriend, Duncan Harkness, whom she was set to marry.

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Annette Christie has set up a Change.org petition, Help Chennan Fei Stay in Scotland - Stop her Deportation, yesterday and has almost hit the 2,500 signature target.

She said: “Chennan has lived more than half her life in Scotland. She has volunteered at several agencies in Glasgow including the Scottish Refugee Council, putting the accountancy skills she learned at university to good use.”

Thousands of people have signed the petition including Green MSP for the Highlands and Islands MSP John Finnie and Glasgow North East SNP MP, Anne McLaughlin.

A Home Office spokeswoman said: “The UK has a proud history of granting asylum to those who need our protection and every case is assessed on its individual merits and in line with immigration rules.

“If someone is found not to need our protection we expect them to leave the UK.

“We do not routinely comment on individual cases.”

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