Man killed when tree fell on tent beside Water of Leith was homeless

Flowers left at the scene of the accident.
Flowers left at the scene of the accident.
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A MAN who was killed after his tent was crushed by a large tree beside the Water of Leith was homeless, police say.

The 45-year-old, who was originally from Glasgow, was camping with another male on Miller Row, in the Dean Village area of the city, when the incident occurred.

Ruth Davis, a tree officer with Edinburgh City Council, inspects the tree. Picture: Toby Williams

Ruth Davis, a tree officer with Edinburgh City Council, inspects the tree. Picture: Toby Williams

A 35-year-old man, who was also sleeping in the tent, suffered minor injuries.

Officers have consulted with forestry experts who concluded that the tree fell as a result of natural occurrences.

Inspector Neill Whiteside of Drylaw said: “This appears to be a tragic set of circumstances which have led to a man losing his life, and his next of kin have now been informed.”

Emergency services rushed to the well-known beauty spot at 3.30am on Saturday but the man was pronounced dead at the scene.

A police spokesman said: “Police in Edinburgh were called to an area of woodlands on the south bank of the Water of Leith, accessed from Miller Row. A very large tree had fallen on a tent in which two men were sleeping and, sadly, one of the men was pronounced dead at the scene.

“A 35-year-old man also suffered minor injuries, but did not require medical treatment.

“Officers have consulted with the appropriate partners who are confident that the tree fell as a result of natural occurrences.

“We’re currently working to trace the deceased’s next of kin, and a report will be submitted to the Procurator Fiscal.”

Miller Row is a pedestrian-only lane next to the picturesque Water of Leith walkway, used by both walkers and cyclists.

It is understood the two men were “wild camping”. It is not known if they were in Edinburgh for the festival season. Accommodation is famously hard to come by throughout August, as tens of thousands of tourists and performers flock to the Capital for the world’s largest arts event. Hotel prices and short-term rents both increase dramatically.