Meet the latest resident at the Scottish Owl Centre

Dug the twenty-five day old burrowing owl plays with a bucket and spade at the Scottish Owl Centre. Picture; SWNS
Dug the twenty-five day old burrowing owl plays with a bucket and spade at the Scottish Owl Centre. Picture; SWNS
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These are the adorable pictures of a grumpy baby owl cheering up as it plays with a bucket and spade in the sand.

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Doug is currently only a matter of inches tall but is expected to grow to his full size within the first 12 weeks of his life. Picture; SWNS

Doug is currently only a matter of inches tall but is expected to grow to his full size within the first 12 weeks of his life. Picture; SWNS

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Doug the burrowing owl is only 27 days old and already looks at those disturbing his play time with a piercing scorn.

After only a matter of weeks at the Scottish Owl Centre, West Lothian, the bird is expected to be the first of its kind to perform in the flying display squad.

Doug is currently only a matter of inches tall but is expected to grow to his full size within the first 12 weeks of his life.

He joins an existing family of three at the centre and is gradually being introduced to visitors at the centre

Doug is still covered in his baby fluff as his adult feathers start to grow upwards on his body.

Lauren Walker, a keeper at the Scottish Owl Centre, said that Doug has shown signs of being grumpy and reluctant to go to work in the morning.

She said: “Doug is an important one to have as part of the flying display team because we don’t actually have one and will now be able to tell more people about them.

“Doug is extremely curious about the world around him and you can see that when he interacts with visitors.

“He is becoming braver and braver by the day so we’ve been watching him closely to make sure that he doesn’t wander too far away.

“But he also has grumpy spells as well and doesn’t always like being woken up in the morning to be taken to work which I’m sure a lot of us can sympathise with.

“They’re often described as the meerkat of the owl world because they share similar behaviours with a burrowing system that has one owl act as a sentry who will raise the alarm when they sense danger.”

Native to North America, the burrowing owl has become endangered in some regions and extinct in others so those that are kept in captivity are crucial to keeping the species alive.

The species is the cousin of the British native little owl.