Cycling: Callum Skinner out after agony at velodrome

Thunder Drome at the Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome, Glasgow. Team Braveheart's Callum Skinner (20) from Edinburgh has a bad fall and has a suspected broken collar bone. Callum won the British senior sprint championship at Manchester earlier this month. Picture Robert Perry The Scotsman 27th Oct 2012
Thunder Drome at the Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome, Glasgow. Team Braveheart's Callum Skinner (20) from Edinburgh has a bad fall and has a suspected broken collar bone. Callum won the British senior sprint championship at Manchester earlier this month. Picture Robert Perry The Scotsman 27th Oct 2012
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Capital cyclist Callum Skinner faces six weeks on the side lines after he broke his clavicle in a crash during the Scottish Track Championships at the Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome in Glasgow on Saturday, writes COLIN RENTON.

The 20-year-old had finished second to team-mate John Paul in the Keirin on Friday – City of Edinburgh provided all six finalists, with Matt Haynes taking bronze. He led the qualifiers in the individual sprint then progressed to a gold medal showdown with Paul.

However, between the semi-final and the title decider, he came to grief during the exhibition Thunderdrome events and was unable to contest the final, handing Paul his second title while Bruce Croall took bronze. Another City of Edinburgh rider, Emma Baird, took the women’s 500 metres title ahead of Eleanor Richardson (Edinburgh RC) and Jenny Davis (City of Edinburgh), and Baird took bronze behind club mate Charline Joiner and Kayleigh Brogan (Team Ibis) in the women’s Keirin.

Riders from the East also took a clutch of age-group titles with rising star Katie Archibald posting a treble in the junior women’s events. The City of Edinburgh club dominated proceedings but the opening of the new facility in Glasgow may herald a move west in the balance of power in Scottish cycling.

Hoy did not compete in the championships but marked the opening of the facility that bears his name with an appearance in the exhibition events. He believes the sport in this country will benefit from an indoor track. Commenting on the demise of Meadowbank, the venue where he learned his trade, the six-times Olympic champion said: “You never knew if you were going to get racing started, never mind finished. You were at the mercy of the weather. But Meadowbank still has a very fond place in my heart.”