New York Times travel writer describes Glasgow as 'remote'

One of the most influential newspapers in the US has been slammed after it called Glasgow, 'remote.'

Friday, 1st September 2017, 12:55 pm
Updated Tuesday, 12th September 2017, 11:50 am
Glasgow, Scotland's largest city was described as remote by a NYT writer.
Glasgow, Scotland's largest city was described as remote by a NYT writer.

The New York Times featured an article titled “36 hours in Glasgow” which appeared to neglect the fact that Scotland’s largest city has around 600,000 people living in it.

Writer, Evan Rail described the Dear Green Place as an ideal “escape for a few days.”

The piece is inarguably a glowing review of Glasgow, with Mr Rail detailing the city’s impressive cultural and culinary offerings at great length.

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However, some Scots have been left confused by the newspaper’s - which has 2.2 million online subscribers - description of Glasgow’s location.

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“The remote setting is also part of the appeal,” Mr Rail writes.

The New York Times is one of the largest and most respected newspaper in the US.

“Located four and a half hours north of London by train, or an hour’s travel west from Edinburgh, this city on the River Clyde makes it easy to really escape for a few days.”

Responding on social media, Jean Kelly wrote: “Remote??”

Samantha Oliver added: “That’s what I thought, maybe someone should tell the NYT that Glasgow has an airport!”

History website @LostGlasgow tweeted: “It’s always interesting ‘to see oursels as ithers see us’, as this New York Times travel feature proves.”

The New York Times is one of the largest and most respected newspaper in the US.

While Glasgow North East MP and shadow Scotland Minister Paul Sweeney shared the article on social media, writing: “Always interesting to see how others see us; in this case the @nytimes. Though I think Glasgow is far from remote!”

The travel writer crammed in a range of activities within in his 36 hour trip, eating his way through many of the city’s popular restaurants.

He picks out “the diverse Southside neighborhood (sic)” as a must-see spot to visit and lavishes praise on “the classic architecture that makes Glasgow beautiful.”