Did you know the history behind some of Edinburgh's most famous streets?

The weird origins of 20 Edinburgh street names

Considering that Edinburgh is home to literary sons and daughters through the ages, it's unsurprising that Edinburgh's street names have poetic and playful origins.

Here are some of the weird and wonderful origins of some of Edinburgh's street names - did you know where their names came from?

This is the final close before the Canongate, named years ago when some poorer Edinburgh residents couldnt even afford to leave the city walls - the street was the figurative end of their world.

1. World's End Close

This is the final close before the Canongate, named years ago when some poorer Edinburgh residents couldnt even afford to leave the city walls - the street was the figurative end of their world.
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Once home to fiery and toxic glass and chemical works, this street apparently takes its name from the salamander lizard as this is the only creature that could live in such conditions, according to folklore.

2. Salamander Street

Once home to fiery and toxic glass and chemical works, this street apparently takes its name from the salamander lizard as this is the only creature that could live in such conditions, according to folklore.
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The name of this narrow Edinburgh thoroughfare translates from Scottish Gaelic as Seat of the King or Kings Croft, and came from its proximity to Holyrood Palace.

3. Croft An Righ

The name of this narrow Edinburgh thoroughfare translates from Scottish Gaelic as Seat of the King or Kings Croft, and came from its proximity to Holyrood Palace.
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In Scottish dialect, cuddy means 'donkey' or 'stupid'. This street is named after its residents according to late Edinburgh author Charles Boog Watson - he doesn't specify whether this is in reference to the animals or the locals.

4. Cuddy Lane

In Scottish dialect, cuddy means 'donkey' or 'stupid'. This street is named after its residents according to late Edinburgh author Charles Boog Watson - he doesn't specify whether this is in reference to the animals or the locals.
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