Top secret clifftop wartime research centre near North Berwick goes on sale with hugely-reduced price tag

A top secret clifftop wartime research station has gone on sale with a hugely-reduced price tag.

Tuesday, 17th September 2019, 08:52 am
Gin Head, sitting on a remote promontory near North Berwick, was set up by the Admiralty during the Second World War to frustrate Luftwaffe attacks on our shores.

Gin Head, sitting on a remote promontory near North Berwick, was set up by the Admiralty during the Second World War to frustrate Luftwaffe attacks on our shores.

It even played a lead role in preparations for D-Day, tricking the Germans into thinking the invasion would happen in the Pas-de-Calais.

When Gin Head’s derelict laboratories went on the market in 2015, an asking price of £3.5 million was invited.

Gin Head, sitting on a remote promontory near North Berwick, was set up by the Admiralty during the Second World War to frustrate Luftwaffe attacks on our shores.

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However, four years later, anyone wishing an impregnable James Bond-style lair can have it for “just” £2.5m.

The unique property comes with planning permission for a stunning “Grand Designs” house dreamed up by a leading firm of Italian architects.

Estate agents Rettie describe it as “one of the most visually compelling sites in Scotland.”

The unique property comes with planning permission for a stunning Grand Designs house dreamed up by a leading firm of Italian architects.

They add: “It is surrounded by sensational rock formations, emerald cliffs and mesmerising, infinite seas.”

The nearest neighbour is the ruins of 14th century Tantallon Castle, perched on another clifftop 300 metres to the east of Gin Head – which also overlooks the Bass Rock with uninterrupted views of its internationally renowned seabird colonies.

For all its nondescript design, Gin Head played a starring role in developing the “dark arts” of warfare during the Second World War.

Dozens of scientists worked tirelessly to intercept communications between enemy destroyers and U-Boats targeting military and merchant shipping. Its greatest success was in the creation of new technology, used to trick the Germans into thinking the 1944 D-Day landings would take place far from Normandy.

The boffins also came up with a system of dropping aluminium foil from aircraft to jam signals to enemy radar stations.

The was in use by the Admiralty until 1984, when it was sold to a major defence contractor.

It is now being offered along with almost six acres of surrounding land. As well as the scheme to develop one single home, Gin Head comes with planning permission to create seven contemporary homes.

A Rettie spokesman added: “Gin Head offers the buyer a wealth of opportunities to create one or more properties in a location with ever changing mesmerising views.”