Abandoned pony found with severe burns from ‘chemical attack’

The RSPCA is funding Cinders' treatment.
The RSPCA is funding Cinders' treatment.
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WARNING: This article contains images that some may find distressing.

An abandoned pony was found suffering with severe burns from a suspected chemical attack.

A foal is currently being treated after being abandoned with burns to its face in a suspected chemical attack.' Picture: Rainbow Equine Hospital

A foal is currently being treated after being abandoned with burns to its face in a suspected chemical attack.' Picture: Rainbow Equine Hospital

The animal was found abandoned at a private property in Chesterfield, Derbyshire on Tuesday and taken to the Rainbow Equine Hospital in north Yorkshire to be treated.

The pony, now named as Cinders, had suffered severe facial burns from what is thought to be a chemical.

A post on the Rainbow Equine Hospital’s Facebook read: “When she arrived at the hospital she was very weak and was unable to open her eyes due to severe burns affecting her eyelids.

“It is thought that the attack was deliberate and resulted from a chemical being thrown in her face.”

Vet David Rendle believes the injuries to its face were caused by someone throwing a chemical substance. Picture: Rainbow Equine Hospital

Vet David Rendle believes the injuries to its face were caused by someone throwing a chemical substance. Picture: Rainbow Equine Hospital

The hospital team treated her with pain relief and antibiotics and her face was cleaned. The areas of dead skin were carefully removed to reduce the risk of infection.

The Facebook post continued: “She was anaemic due to the ongoing blood loss and a heavy burden of skin of intestinal parasites. A blood transfusion was given to increase levels of blood cells and proteins that are vital for healing. Once the treatment had started, she started to eat and become much brighter stronger.

“Her facial injuries will take time to heal but she is making very good progress. There are concerns over the injuries around her eyes and she will require ongoing replacement of the protein that is being lost across her skin as well as wound management and possibly skin grafts.”

The cost of her initial treatment is being funded by the RSPCA and Rainbow Equine Hospital.

A fundraising page has been set up to cover the costs. If you would like to make a donation, click here.

This story orginally featured on our sister site, the Derbyshire Times.