Mum of two died just two hours after ‘Brazilian bum lift’ operation.

Outside Birmingham Coroners Court, Isabel Bathurst, a specialist travel lawyer from Slater and Gordon who is represented the Harry family reads a family statement. Picture: SWNS
Outside Birmingham Coroners Court, Isabel Bathurst, a specialist travel lawyer from Slater and Gordon who is represented the Harry family reads a family statement. Picture: SWNS
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A mum-of-two died just two hours after having a Brazilian bum lift operation, an inquest heard.

Tryce Harry, 49, travelled to Hungary for the surgery which doctors warn is the most dangerous cosmetic procedure in the world.

Bum lifts are one of the most popular procedures, thanks to celebs like Towie star Lauren Goodger, Kim Kardashian and Kylie Jenner.

Mrs Harry, from Birmingham, paid £4,730 for fat to be sucked out of her thighs and pumped into her bottom.

Birmingham Coroner’s Court heard the surgery was carried out by Dr Miklos Molnar at the Human Reconstructive Institute in Budapest on March 19.

Mrs Harry came out of surgery in a stable condition at 5.30pm but an hour later she collapsed after suffering a heart attack and was pronounced dead at 7.30pm.

Her devastated husband Kirk, 51, told the hearing he was not informed about his wife’s death until three hours later.

He told the inquest: “My wife had thought long and hard about having this procedure done.

“It was not a decision made lightly by either of us, but it was her dream and I supported her in it.

“We had no misgivings, no fear. We thought we had found the perfect place.

“We knew other people who had been to the same clinic and were very happy with their treatment.

“My wife was happy the last time I saw her. She was very happy to undergo the procedure and saw it as a new chapter in her life.

“My wife wanted to live more than anything else. We were even planning future events on that day.

“She shouldn’t have died. If I could turn the clock back, I would and I would advise anyone considering this procedure to have it done here in this country where medical practices are expected to be better.

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“Whatever the cost, one can’t put a price on life. You only get one life.

“My wife was quite simply everything to me. To my children and I she was the most

important person in our world, our greatest cheerleader.

“For me, she was the love of my life, the woman I loved more than anyone ever created, my childhood sweetheart and my first love who I adored.

“We had been together for more than 27 years and we were looking forward to the rest of our lives together but now I am forced to go on without her love.

“Tryce was such a wonderful wife and mum, who lived for her family and her passing has changed all of our lives.

“We miss her dreadfully. We are learning to live without her but it’s terribly hard.”

Coroner Emma Brown said her death was not the result of negligence but as a result of her suffering from a fat embolism.

She said: “Her blood pressure and heart pulse post-surgery remained in normal limits.

“By the end of the procedure these records would support she was in a stable condition.

“At 6.35pm her blood pressure deteriorated.

“CPR is clearly shown on the records.

“She was re-incubated.

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“In conjuncture with Mr Molnar the death was recorded at 7.30pm.

“Fat embolism is a higher risk when fat is re-injected.

“She remained stable at 6pm and then a sudden decline at 6.35pm took place.

“I accept that if she was continuously observed then the decline would have been spotted earlier.

“She was monitored every 30 minutes.

“I will not rule that neglect played a role.

“Death was a result of a complication of elective surgery on March 19, 2018 at the human reconstructive institute in Hungary.”

Isabel Bathurst, a specialist travel lawyer from Slater and Gordon who is representing the family, said: “This is a truly heartbreaking case which exposes the risks of travelling abroad for treatment.

“Clinics may have the expertise to perform these procedures but not always a plan in place for if something goes wrong.

“Mrs Harry’s family know nothing can bring her back but hope that now, by speaking out, other people will think more carefully before undergoing procedures such as this in the future.”

The controversial procedure involves taking fat from other parts of the body and injecting it into the bum to make it bigger.

In August mum-of-three Leah Cambridge died during a botched operation in Turkey.

The 29-year-old, from Leeds, suffered three heart attacks during the £3,000 operation.

The British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (Baaps) has previously warned people are putting themselves at risk by opting for cheap ops at clinics overseas.

ENS