Storm Ophelia: Thousands without power as recovery process begins

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Three people have died and thousands have been left without power across the UK after Storm Ophelia battered the country.

Ireland and Northern Ireland bore the brunt of the storm, however, Ophelia had a significant impact on Scotland as 70mph winds blasted the country on Tuesday.

Waves crash over the breakwater as the remnants of Hurricane Ophelia hit Saltcoats on the west coast of Scotland on the morning of 17th October 2017.' Picture; Getty

Waves crash over the breakwater as the remnants of Hurricane Ophelia hit Saltcoats on the west coast of Scotland on the morning of 17th October 2017.' Picture; Getty

Wind and flood warnings were in place on its west coast as the remnants of the hurricane hit the country.

READ MORE: Video: Storm Ophelia causes tenement to collapses in Glasgow

Commuters were hit by delays caused by the weather, with several rail lines blocked by fallen trees and other problems.

Train services were temporarily hit between Glasgow and Edinburgh, and from the capital to Aberdeen, Dundee and Perth, as trees were blown on to tracks.

Picture; Getty

Picture; Getty

In Glasgow part of a derelict block of flats already earmarked for partial demolition collapsed at about 4am, and a scout hall roof was blown off in Dumfries and Galloway as the region took the brunt of winds up to 77mph.

In Cumbria the county council said high winds had torn the roof from a house in Whitehaven and even torn traffic lights from their poles, as well as causing traffic disruption.

Part of the roof of a stand at National League team Barrow AFC was also ripped off by the wind.

READ MORE: Scotland’s weather: Hurricane Ophelia brings gales and rain

Workmen survey the damage to a block of flats in Crosshill, in the south side of Glasgow, after part of  the front  was brought down in high winds. Picture; PA

Workmen survey the damage to a block of flats in Crosshill, in the south side of Glasgow, after part of the front was brought down in high winds. Picture; PA

And thousands of households and businesses across the UK and ireland do not have power, with some also having to conserve their water supply are repair works continue and resevoirs are re-filled.

Crews from Northern Ireland will join efforts on Tuesday while others from Scotland and France are expected to be drafted in to help from Wednesday as schools on both sides of the Irish border remained closed for a second day as authorities began to assess the damage, but most are expected to open on Wednesday.

READ MORE: Man struck in head by debris on Nicolson Street due to storm winds

Ireland’s national emergency co-ordination group was meeting in Dublin on Tuesday to assess the extent of the damage.

Prime Minister Theresa May spoke to her Irish counterpart Leo Varadkar on Monday afternoon to offer support.

The UK Met Office has reduced the area covered by a yellow weather warning, but has still said a spell of “very windy weather is likely”.

The warning now covers south-west Scotland, parts of north-east England and Yorkshire.

Its forecast said: “Some damage to buildings, such as tiles blown from roofs, could happen.”