Covid Scotland: EasyJet cancels planned routes between Edinburgh Airport and Manchester Airport amid row over coronavirus travel restrictions

EasyJet has cancelled a planned route between Edinburgh Airport and Manchester, citing restrictions imposed on travel to the region by the Scottish Government.

Wednesday, 23rd June 2021, 1:01 pm

The company is also unable to run flights between Aberdeen Airport and Manchester.

A spokesperson for easyJet said: “Following the Scottish Government's announcement that non-essential travel between Scotland and Manchester is currently not permitted, unfortunately we are no longer able to operate our planned new routes connecting Edinburgh and Aberdeen with Manchester.”

They said customers due to travel of affected flights would be notified of the cancellation and “informed of their options” - including transferring their trip to an alternative destination on easyJet’s network or to a later date free of charge.

Sign up to our daily newsletter

The i newsletter cut through the noise

Customers will also be able receive a voucher or refund for the entire value of their booking. They added: “We would like to apologise for the inconvenience caused by the latest news and cancellations."

It is understood that easyJet will reassess the viability of both routes when there is greater clarity on when the travel restrictions will end.

Read More

Read More
Part of Edinburgh's Ocean Terminal looks set for demolition as owners talk of "e...

The route cancellations come as the travel industry holds protests in London, Edinburgh and Belfast, calling for more government support for the sector’s recovery.

EasyJet has cancelled a planned route between Edinburgh Airport and Manchester, citing restrictions imposed on travel to the region by the Scottish Government.

A spokesman for Edinburgh Airport said: “The Scottish Government will by now understand that its decisions have economic consequences that need to be considered.

“Today’s day of protest at Holyrood by the travel industry underlines the severity of issues it faces.

"We’re not sure that imposing unenforceable regulations that impact on the recovery of that industry is what we need right now.”

The decision comes after First Minister Nicola Sturgeon announced on Friday that non-essential travel between Scotland and Manchester and Scotland and Salford would be banned from Monday.

Citing the relatively high infection rate in the region, Ms Sturgeon said the restrictions would be in place "no longer than is absolutely necessary".

But the decision sparked a row between the Scottish Government and the Labour Mayor of Greater Manchester, Andy Burnham

Mr Burnham claimed the decision was "announced out of the blue" and was "completely disproportionate".

He told BBC Radio Scotland's Drivetime: "The UK government has called me when they were making changes affecting Greater Manchester.

“I think the first minister should have extended us the same courtesy.”

He also questioned why the travel ban affects residents of Bolton, where the latest seven-day case rate was 257 per 100,000 people - but not residents in Dundee, where the figure up to June 18 was 303.4.

On Tuesday, the First Minister responded, telling MSPs: “I have always got on well with Andy Burnham. If he wants a grown-up conversation he only has to pick up the phone.

"But if, as I suspect might be the case, this is more about getting into a spat with me as part of a some positioning in a Labour leadership contest of the future, then I am not interested.

"Back in May we imposed travel restrictions on Bolton for exactly the same reasons we are now doing it on Manchester," she said.

"Andy Burnham is mayor of Bolton as well and he did not raise any of these issues then."

The Scottish Government has been approached for comment.

A message from the Editor:

Thank you for reading this article. We're more reliant on your support than ever as the shift in consumer habits brought about by coronavirus impacts our advertisers.

If you haven't already, please consider supporting our trusted, fact-checked journalism by taking out a digital subscription.