Cloned monkeys follow in footsteps of Edinburgh’s Dolly the Sheep

Cloned monkey Hua Hua sits with a fabric toy. For the first time, researchers have used the cloning method that produced Dolly the Sheep to create two healthy monkeys, potentially bringing scientists closer to being able to do that with humans
Cloned monkey Hua Hua sits with a fabric toy. For the first time, researchers have used the cloning method that produced Dolly the Sheep to create two healthy monkeys, potentially bringing scientists closer to being able to do that with humans
0
Have your say

Two monkeys have followed in the footsteps of Dolly the Sheep by becoming the world’s first primates to be cloned from transferred DNA.

Identical long-tailed macaques Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua were born eight and six weeks ago respectively at a laboratory in China.

The success marks a watershed in cloning research and raises major ethical questions.

The aim of the scientists was to pave the way for populations of genetically uniform monkeys that can be customised for ground-breaking research into human diseases.

But the cloning of monkeys will be viewed by some as a step too far towards the eventual creation of tailor-made humans.

Dolly made history 20 years ago after being cloned at the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh. It was the first time scientists had managed to clone a mammal from an adult cell, taken from the udder of a Finn Dorset sheep.