14 random things we miss about Edinburgh in the 1990s

GIANT gorillas, museum goldfish, bus periscopes and neon golf signs. Edinburgh was a very different place in the nineties.

Friday, 18th January 2019, 7:33 pm
Updated Saturday, 19th January 2019, 9:03 pm
EDINBURGH CONGESTION CHARGES. PICS TO GO WITH STORY ABOUT A DECISION ON CONGESTION CHARGES IN EDINBURGH. PICS SHOW THE BUSY STREETS OF EDINBURGH CITY CENTRE. PASSENGERS ON A DOUBLE DECKER BUS WATCH OUT THE WINDOWS AS TRAFFIC BUILDS UP ON PRINCES STREET. PIC PHIL WILKINSON / TSPL STAFF.

Here are fourteen random things we miss about Edinburgh as it was two decades ago. Nostalgia, as they say, just ain’t what it used to be...

Before buses were all fitted with CCTV, the driver used a kind of periscope contraption with a curved mirror to check what was going on upstairs.
Sticking with the buses.. it was a sad day when the middle doors were removed. We hear they are soon to make a comeback - yay!
While Brattisani's are best remembered for their excellent fish and chips, their Newington branch is perhaps best recalled from a visual perspective for these distinctive red booths.

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The Gulliver sculpture was a 100ft long play structure built in the 1970s. It was demolished around 2011 after being deemed unsafe.
Removed in the early 2000s, we don't really miss the Princes Street tripods that much, but they were decorated with cool lights at Christmas.
Up until a few days ago, the main entrance into the National Museum of Scotland was via a steep flight of stone steps and through a narrow revolving door. Not exactly ideal for the elderly and infirm.
Once upon a time the National Museum's main hall featured two large fish ponds, which were removed during the last major revamp.
Leith's maritime heritage was recalled by a large iron anchor that sat for a couple of decades within the Newkirkgate Shopping Centre. It was removed around 2001.
Waverley Station's kitsch orange plastic seating will be fairly ingrained in the memories of those over the age of 35.
Situated bang slap in the middle of Festival Square off Lothian Road, you probably forgot all about these.
Removed in the early 2000s, these were enjoyed by generations of Edinburgh kids. An urban myth was abound at the time that these were removed due to individuals sticking razor blades in between the gaps.
A once ubiquitous sight on Princes Street at the corner with Hanover Street during the late 1990s. This garish-looking sign is burned deep into the memory banks.
The exterior of the Waverley Shopping Centre, now Waverley Mall, was once peppered with these funky-looking sculptures, some of which doubled up as supports for the entrance canopies.
The King Kong gorilla statue at Ingliston Market. Prime meeting spot for obvious reasons.